OSHA Safety
Does the Safety Dance Song Really Improve Workplace Safety?

Dancing for Safety

Trying to maintain workplace safety is never easy. Companies write best practices, policies and guidelines regularly to keep workers safe. Where there is often a breakdown is in having people actually follow those practices, policies and guidelines. As a former educator, engaging students and having them work with me rather than against me could be challenging. Even though my subject matter was science and my students were high school students, the data is clear. Music is a powerful tool to help with learning, driving concepts home and strengthening the mind.

So, to get workers involved with their own safety perhaps the 1980s song “Safety Dance” by the band Men Without Hats can be used. (Click here to hear the song) Granted the lyrics are not exactly written for workplace safety but the rhythm of the song and the chorus can be used to ask some basic questions every employee should ask every day.

Safety Questions

What are the basic safety questions that can keep someone safe? Various websites are dedicated to worker safety and tips for maintaining it. Below is a list of my top five.

  1. What is my work area?
    This is important to know in case there is electrical equipment, hazardous chemicals or machinery in your area that could impact how you do a job. Be aware of any changes in the area and be sure Continue Reading…
OSHA Labeling
Workplace Labels – An Essential Part of Workplace Safety

Nola Murphy’s Story

It was in a soft-drink bottle. It looked like lemonade. But 73-year-old Nola Murphy discovered, after pouring herself a glass, that it wasn’t. In fact, it was a toxic mould-remover that a cleaner had left sitting on a restaurant bar. The cleaner had poured the product from a larger container into the soft drink bottle for easier handling.

Mrs. Murphy was lucky – she survived the experience, although she required emergency hospital treatment. But her story, given in an article in the New Zealand Medical Journal, shows how putting hazardous chemicals in unlabeled containers can be a recipe for disaster. (More: The New Zealand Herald)

Many countries, including the United States and Canada, require hazardous chemicals sold to the workplace to be labeled by the supplier. Regulations such as the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), and Canada’s WHMIS (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System), set out the basic requirements for such labels (called “supplier labels” under WHMIS, and “labels for shipped containers” by OSHA). But as Mrs. Murphy’s experience shows, many hazardous chemicals still end up in unlabeled containers. They may be poured (“decanted”) from larger containers for convenience. The original supplier label may have been damaged or removed. Or two or more chemicals in separate containers may be mixed together to make a new product. No matter how it happens, unlabeled chemicals create a Continue Reading…

Safety Training – Training or Education?

Safety training for workers is a key component of occupational health and safety regulations throughout North America.

 

Training & Education

Although the dictionary definitions distinguish between the two terms (To paraphrase – “Training: …action of teaching … a skill or type of behavior…”; “Education: The process of receiving … instruction … or … information about or training in a particular subject…”), the objective is to ensure that workers have both the knowledge and skills to ensure that they return home safely at the end of the day. One might add “in at least as good condition as when they arrived” (although when I worked in the pharmaceutical industry some people qualified that – “no better or worse than when you arrived…”).

View all of our Workplace Safety and HazMat/DG training courses »

Regardless of the term used, the processes require that workers receive knowledge of both the specific skills and behaviors to maintain a safe work environment; as well as the knowledge to apply the skills effectively to identify known or developing hazards and protect against them. Also, although we hope it’s “insurance” in our enlightened world, knowledge of rights and responsibilities under occupational health and safety regulations is an important piece of the program.

Although skill training often focuses on the mechanics of how the worker is to do tasks (e.g. put on a harness, wear a respirator, fill out Continue Reading…

How to Beat the Heat – (Not Just for SPURS Fans)

If you work outdoors or are exposed to extreme heat you could be at risk for heat stress. Everybody can handle a little stress, but too much stress, in regards to heated working environments, can quickly turn into much more serious conditions such as, heat stroke, heat exhaustion, heat cramps, rashes, and dehydration. Prevention of heat stress in workers is important. Recognition of potential elevated temperatures in the working environment is the responsibility of both employer and employee.

It doesn’t have to be really hot outside for heat stress to occur. Losing the opportunity to periodically cool down, rehydrate and rest allows the body’s temperature to keep rising. A person can get heat stress even when working in 70 degree weather. Air circulation, hydration, and frequent rest periods (or lack of all three) have the ability to amplify or diminish heat related symptoms. Employers should provide training to workers so they understand what heat stress is, how it affects their health and safety, and how it can be prevented.

Each year organizations like OSHA, and CDC publish warnings and potential health risks regarding the upcoming seasons. Below is the annual refresher on heat stress types and management provided by the CDC. Stay cool!


Heat Stroke

Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related disorder. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the Continue Reading…

What is the Cost of Doing Business Safely?

According to OSHA the Most Frequently Cited Standards


The following were the top 10 most frequently cited standards in fiscal year 2012 (October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012):

  1. Fall protection, construction (29 CFR 1926.501) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  2. Hazard communication standard, general industry (29 CFR 1910.1200) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  3. Scaffolding, general requirements, construction (29 CFR 1926.451) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  4. Respiratory protection, general industry (29 CFR 1910.134) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  5. Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), general industry (29 CFR 1910.147) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  6. Powered industrial trucks, general industry (29 CFR 1910.178) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  7. Electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general industry (29 CFR 1910.305) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  8. Ladders, construction (29 CFR 1926.1053) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  9. Machines, general requirements, general industry (29 CFR 1910.212) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  10. Electrical systems design, general requirements, general industry (29 CFR 1910.303) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

The following are the standards for which OSHA assessed the highest penalties in fiscal year 2012 (October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012):

  1. Fall protection, construction (29 CFR 1926.501) [related OSHA Safety Continue Reading…
First Aid
What’s in Your First Aid Kit?

Have you ever thought about what’s in your first aid kit? We walk by them and never even notice them until we need them. If you are not monitoring them on a regular basis and know what they contain, when you need them it may be too late. According to OSHA’s Medical and First Aid standard at §1910.151(b), you need to have “adequate” first aid supplies readily available in the workplace. OSHA doesn’t define exactly what is considered “adequate,” but the kit contents should reflect the particular hazards of your workplace. Also, you may want guidance in putting together a basic kit. For that, you’ll have to go to the ANSI Z308.1-1998 consensus standard which lists the minimum contents of a generic first aid kit adequate for small worksites.

The Basic First Aid Kit

The ANSI Z308.1-1998 consensus standard provides a list of minimum items for a workplace first aid kit. It also contains requirements for indoor and outdoor kits and provides guidelines for:

  • The standard sizes of cases;
  • Unit packaging, including color coding;
  • Specifications for the most commonly used items; and
  • The arrangement of first aid materials for easy identification, removal, and replacement

ANSI Z308-1 requires that the minimum acceptable contents of a first aid kit (for a small workplace) include:

  • An absorbent compress,
  • Adhesive bandages and tape,
  • Individual-use antiseptics,
  • Burn treatment applications,
  • Sterile pads,
  • Triangular bandage, and
  • Medical exam gloves.

The standard suggests that kit contents be inspected regularly Continue Reading…

Ergonomics for Work and Play

Ergonomic conditions are disorders of the soft tissues often caused by factors such as overexertion while lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or reaching, among other causes.

Each June, the National Safety Council encourages others to get involved and participate in National Safety Month. NSM is an annual observance to educate and influence behaviors around the leading causes of preventable injuries and deaths. Each week of the month carries a theme to bring attention to critical safety issues. This week, NSC is releasing helpful information and materials on preventing ergonomic conditions, such as overexertion.

According to the Injury Facts 2012 Edition, overexertion is the third leading cause of unintentional injuries in the United States, accounting for about 3.2 million emergency department visits.

Ergonomic conditions are disorders of the soft tissues often caused by factors such as overexertion while lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or reaching, among other causes. Ergonomic conditions are best dealt with when caught early.

The signs of ergonomic conditions include:

  • pain
  • swelling
  • numbness
  • tingling
  • tenderness
  • clicking
  • loss of grip strength

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, make sure to see your physician or an occupational physician as soon as possible to determine the cause of your pain.
Body pains

Visit the National Safety Council’s website this June at nsc.org/nsm for a factsheet and quiz on ergonomics.