GHS
GHS in North America and Europe – Where Are We Now?

Isn’t everyone using GHS for SDS’s and labels?

The answer to that is yes, and also no.

The European Union (EU)

In the EU, REACH [Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 concerning the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals] and GHS regulations [Regulation (EC) No. 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures, or the ‘CLP’] have already been implemented for many years. Most phases of the EU’s implementation plan have already been completed. There is one last remaining date that has not yet passed, however, with respect to SDS’s and labels.

SDS’s and labels for pure substances are required to fully compliant with REACH and the CLP. The last transition date for pure substance SDS’s was completed on December 1, 2012. Any SDS and label for a pure substance after that date, had to be fully compliant with REACH and CLP regulations, and display only GHS information.

SDS’s and labels for mixtures, for products placed on the market in the EU for the first time after June 1, 2015, are also required to be fully compliant with REACH and the CLP, and display only GHS information.

Mixture SDS’s and labels, only for products already placed on the market in the EU for the first time before June 1, 2015, however, may still show old system EU information. These SDS’s and labels for mixtures, may still display the EU’s old system Continue Reading…

No Harmonization for Combustible Liquids in the US

On May 30, 2012, the DOT rescinded an April 2010 ANPRM regarding Combustible Liquids. The DOT was soliciting comments whether to consider harmonization of the Hazardous Material Regulations (HMR) applicable to the transport of combustible liquids with the international transportation standards as seen in the UN Recommendations.

The ANPRM was to invite public comments on the amendment to the HMR, and make recommendations on how to revise, clarify or relax requirements to facilitate transport and still ensure safety.

Under the HMR, when packaged in non-bulk packagings, a material with a flash point of 100 -140 oF may be reclassed as combustible liquids and are not subject to the HMR when transported by highway or rail. These materials ARE regulated as flammable liquids when transported by vessel under the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code and by aircraft under the International Civil Aviation Organization’s Technical Instructions (ICAO Technical Instructions). In addition, there are some exemptions for combustible liquids when transported domestically in bulk quantities.

The classification system in the UN Recommendations has no combustible liquid category or hazard class. The domestic regulation of these materials is in conflict and may be confusing to both domestic and international shippers and carriers of flammable and combustible liquid shipments.

The Results are In

The majority of the commenters opposed harmonization and elimination of the combustible liquid classification and expressed support for the non-bulk and bulk Continue Reading…