Single Packaging
UN Packaging Need Forecasted to Grow!!!

Although the various regulations continue to change year by year, the need for UN packaging continues to be a necessity for dangerous goods shippers. In fact, a recent report predicts the need for UN packaging will continue to grow over the next decade. The growth of the UN packaging market is expected to be mainly driven by the need for safe and secure packaging for dangerous goods that need special handling. The report is based on a compilation of first-hand information, assessments by industry analysts, and input from industry experts and participants across the value chain. A request for a sample copy of the report can be made here.

Why is Growth Expected?

Customization of UN packaging for specific designs is expected to lead to new market avenues of growth for the global hazmat packaging market. For example, a wide variety of sizes of lithium batteries and other solid articles are out there on the market, and oftentimes stock items aren’t available that meet the specific dimensions that are needed. With reliance on items containing lithium batteries expecting to increase, so will the need to package them.

In addition, since non-compliance within the various regulations of hazardous materials can be costly due to fines and rejections, shippers and end users simply prefer UN packaging in order to comply with the regulations and maintain an element of safety within Continue Reading…

UN Performance Packaging – Filling Limits

UN Packaging codes reveal necessary information about a package’s specifications.  They provide concise answers to questions of:
what it can hold, how much, where it was authorized, when it was made, etc.
The UN packaging code, however, doesn’t always tell the whole story…

Although there may be other test levels achieved, these may not be reflected on the packaging itself.  For example, take a steel drum that has successfully passed the most stringent tests (PG I), and is marked accordingly with the ‘X’ performance level.  This package, in all probability, can/has also passed the less rigorous tests required to meet both the ‘Y’ and ‘Z’ performance level. (Referencing a testing certificate, a test report, or the registration of a successfully tested package, will confirm this.)

So what does this all mean?
Filling limits for single or composite packaging, containing less hazardous material for which they were tested & marked (e.g. PG III material in a PG I packaging), can be re-calculated as per below.

Provided all the performance criteria can still be achieved by the higher relative density product, the following will apply:

For liquids:

a.  A packing group I packaging may be used for a packing group II material with a specific gravity not exceeding the greater of 1.8, or 1.5 times the specific gravity marked on the packaging.

b. A packing group I packaging may be used for a packing group III material with Continue Reading…