Single Packaging
Change Notice: BX-19SP & BX-21SP

In an effort to continuously improve the quality and performance of our UN packaging, we occasionally must make changes to the specifications and usage instructions. This notice is to inform you that the following changes have been made to BX-19SP and BX-21SP.

  1. The clear tape required for closure of this packaging has changed from 3M #305 48mm wide clear tape to 3M #375 48mm wide clear tape. This change to a stronger tape caused the box to perform better in drop tests, resulting in a more secure packaging.

BX-19SP – USA

BX-19SP – Canada

BX-21SP

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our customer relations center in the US at 888-442-9628 or in Canada at 888-977-4834.

Thank you,
Karrie Ishmael
Regulatory Manager

Single Packaging
Change Notice: BX-12SP

In an effort to continuously improve the quality and performance of our UN packaging, we occasionally must make changes to the specifications and usage instructions. This notice is to inform you that the following changes have been made to BX-12SP.

  1. The clear tape required for closure of this packaging has changed from 3M #305 48mm wide clear tape to 3M #375 48mm wide clear tape. This change to a stronger tape caused the box to perform better in drop tests, resulting in a more secure packaging.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our customer relations center in the US at 888-442-9628 or in Canada at 888-977-4834.

Thank you,
Michael S. Zendano
Packaging Specialist

Single Packaging
Single Packaging Simplified

How to Select and Use Single Packaging

“Less is more” is a concept that applies to many things, including selecting packaging for hazardous chemicals. Is dealing with complicated packaging designs with multiple components too costly and time consuming? Do you want to “go green” by eliminating unnecessary packaging material? If you do, the minimalistic single packaging format may be for you.

What is Single Packaging?

Basically, single packaging is packaging that does not incorporate inner containers. It can be compared to the other major packaging type, the combination packaging, which has inner containers inside an outer packaging. The design of a single packaging, by contrast, consists of one single “layer” of packaging and a closure. Typical single packagings include:

  • Drums
  • Jerricans (rectangular drums)
  • Boxes (if no inner packagings are used)
  • Bags
  • Barrels

For hazardous materials, single packagings must be tested according to the United Nations (UN) specifications. This involves preparing samples of the packaging design, and running them through a gauntlet of tests that simulate common causes of package failures. These tests include a drop test and a stacking test, as well as others aimed at specific packagings, such as fibreboard components or wooden barrels.

Types of Single Packaging

Single packagings are divided into two types – those that will be used for solids only, and those that also can be used to ship liquids. The main difference is that those suitable Continue Reading…

UN Performance Packaging – Filling Limits

UN Packaging codes reveal necessary information about a package’s specifications.  They provide concise answers to questions of:
what it can hold, how much, where it was authorized, when it was made, etc.
The UN packaging code, however, doesn’t always tell the whole story…

Although there may be other test levels achieved, these may not be reflected on the packaging itself.  For example, take a steel drum that has successfully passed the most stringent tests (PG I), and is marked accordingly with the ‘X’ performance level.  This package, in all probability, can/has also passed the less rigorous tests required to meet both the ‘Y’ and ‘Z’ performance level. (Referencing a testing certificate, a test report, or the registration of a successfully tested package, will confirm this.)

So what does this all mean?
Filling limits for single or composite packaging, containing less hazardous material for which they were tested & marked (e.g. PG III material in a PG I packaging), can be re-calculated as per below.

Provided all the performance criteria can still be achieved by the higher relative density product, the following will apply:

For liquids:

a.  A packing group I packaging may be used for a packing group II material with a specific gravity not exceeding the greater of 1.8, or 1.5 times the specific gravity marked on the packaging.

b. A packing group I packaging may be used for a packing group III material with Continue Reading…