Single Packaging
Change Notice: BX-15SP

Dear Valued Customer,

In an effort to continuously improve the quality and performance of our UN packaging, we occasionally must make changes to the specifications and usage instructions. This notice is to inform you that the following changes have been made to BX-15SP (PK-15SP).

  • The maximum gross weight allowance for this design has been increased from 19.6Kg to 31 kg. The specification marking that is printed on the boxes has been updated to reflect this change. 
Click here to view our packing instructions and certificate downloads.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our customer relations center in the US at 888-442-9628 or in Canada at 888-977-4834. 

Thank you, 

Michael S. Zendano
Packaging and Regulatory Specialist

BX-15SP 4GV UN packaging
Securepacc Paint Cans packaging
Solving the Damaged Paint Can Riddle
Simulation of damaged paint cans during transport

As we all know, when shipping dangerous goods the shipper has the following responsibilities

  • Proper packaging.
  • Proper markings on the packaging.
  • Proper description on the shipping papers.

All 3 require training in hazardous materials.  However, what if the proper packaging isn’t available? After all, it is also our responsibility to prevent loss and damage during normal transportation and handling according to FedEx. In the last several years here at ICC, the need for paint can shippers that don’t leak and dent has gone through the roof. I have been contacted by several different large paint distributors all looking to solve the same riddle; how do I get my paint cans from point A to point B without damage and leaking? Challenge accepted! The first step is to decide what metric to use to determine if the packaging will damage or leak during normal transit.  Well a while back I wrote a blog on ISTA 6-FEDEX-A testing, http://blog.thecompliancecenter.com/ista-series-6-6-fedex-a-testing-vs-standard-un-testing/, which helps determine how well a package will perform out in the field. So I figured that would be a good starting point. Basically, our goal was to create paint can shippers that not only would survive the 10 drops from 30 inches up that the FedEx testing requires, but also have minimal to no damage on the paint cans at all.

Quart/Liter Shippers

Securepacc™ quart/liter shipper

During the testing Continue Reading…

Single Packaging
UN Packaging Need Forecasted to Grow!!!

Although the various regulations continue to change year by year, the need for UN packaging continues to be a necessity for dangerous goods shippers. In fact, a recent report predicts the need for UN packaging will continue to grow over the next decade. The growth of the UN packaging market is expected to be mainly driven by the need for safe and secure packaging for dangerous goods that need special handling. The report is based on a compilation of first-hand information, assessments by industry analysts, and input from industry experts and participants across the value chain. A request for a sample copy of the report can be made here.

Why is Growth Expected?

Customization of UN packaging for specific designs is expected to lead to new market avenues of growth for the global hazmat packaging market. For example, a wide variety of sizes of lithium batteries and other solid articles are out there on the market, and oftentimes stock items aren’t available that meet the specific dimensions that are needed. With reliance on items containing lithium batteries expecting to increase, so will the need to package them.

In addition, since non-compliance within the various regulations of hazardous materials can be costly due to fines and rejections, shippers and end users simply prefer UN packaging in order to comply with the regulations and maintain an element of safety within Continue Reading…

Repacking Dangerous Goods
Can You Spot the Error?
Can you Spot the error on this UN marking

The UN Number Reads: 1H2/Y1.5/30

This was the plastic drum used for shipping UN1760, PG II product. 

I received a call from one of our clients to assist them with a rejected shipment. They are air certified but they don’t ship via air that often; hence, why they had some issues and needed our expertise. For the folks that ship air regularly, we all know that if you don’t cross your “t” and dot your “i” it won’t go and it can be frustrating for those shipping via air infrequently.

1H2 or 1H1?

The shipment consisted of 2 plastic pails which was dropped to our location by the carrier as directed by our client.  First thing I look for is if the pails are UN standardized and yes, they were. Based on the quantity limit per package, it had to go cargo aircraft only and must follow packing instruction 855.  Looked at PI 855 and sure enough a “1H2” is not permitted to be used as a single packaging.  Our client mainly ships ground and this pail is acceptable for ground shipping but since it’s going via air and it’s PG II, it must be a closed head drum, a 1H1.

Yes, it’s very frustrating. Called our client back and advised him it can’t go the way it’s currently packaged. Must be transferred into a 1H1 or another closed head single Continue Reading…

OSHA Labeling
Can you ship DG and non-DG Together in One Package?

Can you ship DG and non-DG Together in One Package?

Surprisingly this is pretty common. Normally the answer is, “Sure.”

However, that’s not always the case. Sometimes a dangerous goods commodity can react with a non-dangerous goods commodity. I do come across this type of situation occasionally.

Shipping from Canada to USA via Air

Earlier this week a client dropped off 2 different product samples going to USA via air transport. He provided the SDS for both products, one was DG and the other not. He asked if both samples can go together in one package. I told him, “Maybe.” Without consulting the SDSs and gathering more information I couldn’t be sure. If they are compatible, then I can package them together.

I used to work in the carrier industry so I know it’s better to consolidate than to have a multiple piece shipment. Most times all the pieces will arrive together, but there is a chance they may not. So for me, personally, I prefer to minimize the number of packages, which means using a bigger box if I need to.

Determining Compatibility

So back to this. I checked the SDS for both and the one that was DG was a corrosive material.

The non-DG product requires a more thorough read-through to see which material this material was incompatible with and in Section 10: Stability and Reactivity it said incompatible with oxidizing materials Continue Reading…

Single Packaging
ICC’s UN Approved Boxes Now Meet ASTM D5118 Standards

Going Above and Beyond

ICC Compliance Center’s line of UN approved boxes now meet ASTM D5118 Standard Practice for Fabrication of Fiberboard Shipping Boxes. ASTM D5118 boxes meet manufacturing requirements that are written for corrugated and solid fiberboard boxes by ASTM International, an international standards organization that develops and publishes voluntary technical standards for a wide range of products including packaging.

This standard ensures factors and components such as adhesive or fasteners at the manufactures joint of the corrugated box are controlled during the manufacturing process. The ASTM-D5118 Standard provides a first-rate practice for manufacturing criteria of commercial fiberboard styles and packaging ensuring a consistent manufacturing process across the board for our Hazmat boxes. For more information please visit ASTM International’s website below.

https://www.astm.org/

Regulatory Helpdesk: March 12

Combustible Liquids, Using Chemtrec’s Number, Keeping Up-To-Date, and Other Paperwork

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

DG Documentation on Overpacks

Q. If there are multiple skids of dangerous goods (overpacks) in a shipment on which one should the copies of the invoices and shipping papers be attached?
A. Neither the DOT nor IATA regulations tell you to put “paperwork” on the outer packages or overpacks. That is a carrier/driver thing. All the regulations care about is the proper marking and labeling that they require. You also have to be able to physically hand your paperwork to the carrier. Your best bet would be to talk to your carrier directly as to how they want it handled.

Combustible Liquids

Q. I have a liquid with a flashpoint of 100° F and it does not meet any other hazard classes. It is not an RQ, waste or marine pollutant. After manufacturing, it is placed in tubes and then shipped for sale in retail stores. What marks and labels are needed on the outside of the packages?
A. The flashpoint of this material is 100° F and there are no other hazards under the transport regulations. This means it technically meets the definition of a flammable liquid in Packing Group III per §173.120 Continue Reading…
HazMat box with tape gun
Am I Using the Right Tape on my HazMat Shipment? (FAQ)

Man preparing shipment

Frequently Asked Questions About Tape Being Used With UN Boxes

Often times I get questions regarding which type of tape could be used with the various packaging we sell here at ICC Compliance Center. Like many other answers to questions, most of the questions can be answered straight from the regulations. As many of us know, sometimes when it comes to packaging, the regulations may not be specific enough to the questions we have. That’s when I turn to the PHMSA Interpretations for guidance.

What are PHMSA Interpretations?

PHMSA interpretations are written explanations of the hazardous materials regulations by various members of the D.O.T. They come in in the form of letters that are answering specific questions asked by a wide variety of dangerous goods professionals. They are to be used only as a form of guidance when following the regulations.

Do keep in mind that the interpretations that are currently posted in the database reflect the current application of the 49 CFR to the specific questions and may be removed if there are changes to the regulations or deemed inaccurate. The PHMSA interpretation browser can be found on PHMSA’s website.

HazMat Shipment Tape FAQs

Q. Can I put more strips of the tape than what is referenced in the closing instructions along the seam of the box?
A. Yes. Per Interpretation Response #06-0129 at the link below, as long as the specified Continue Reading…
DOT 49 CFR USA
Alternative Ways to Ship Perfume Under 49 CFR

Different bottle of perfume on a wooden table

Shipping Perfume: The Regulations

Every so often our regulatory team is asked a question that on the surface seems funny but in reality, has some interesting facets upon review. For example, can a perfume ever be shipped as anything but a perfume under the 49 CFR regulations? It sounds like a basic question. The short answer is yes. However, when you move through the intricacies of the regulations it can be a quite complex answer dependent on many factors.

Exceptions

Most of us familiar with the regulations would immediately think about the exceptions for small quantities, excepted quantities, de minimis, limited quantities and consumer commodities. However, before we can look at any of those, you need a clear indication of what you are actually shipping. 

For perfume the shipping description is UN1266, Perfumery products, Class 3, Packing Group II or III. There is one special provision that applies for ground shipments on this entry. It is SP-149 that allows the inner container limit to be 1.3 gallons or 5 L when shipped as limited quantity or consumer commodity.

Let’s look at each exception and see if it would apply:

  1. 4 Small Quantity (§173.4). For this exception, we are limited to domestic highway and rail transport only. We also see that our Class 3 material is allowed. The maximum amount allowed per inner container for this exception is 1 oz. or 30 ml.
  2. Excepted Quantity Continue Reading…
Excepted Quantities
UPS Excepted Quantities Update

Red semi truck on highway

UPS Makes Changes to its International Special Commodities (ISC) Program

UPS has announced it will be making changes to its International Special Commodifies (ISC) Program which enables selected customers under contract to ship certain prohibited articles.

This initiative has added more than 50 countries that can ship biological substances, shipments utilizing dry ice, and goods in excepted quantities internationally.

What does this Include?

UPS will now pick up and deliver packages containing UN3373 (Biologic Substances, Category B, Diagnostic Specimen and Clinical Specimen) as well as UN1845 (Carbon Dioxide, solid or dry ice) to 51 added countries and territories bringing the total number of countries to over 100.

In addition, the countries that were added to the list can now ship dangerous goods in excepted quantities internationally if authorized by the regulations.

The full list of approved countries can be found here:
UPS – Approved Countries

What is an Excepted Quantity?

Dangerous goods shipped in excepted quantities allow relief from certain regulations in small quantities outlined by IATA in §2.6. Be sure to check IATA for specific details and to use the label below when shipping in excepted quantities.

Excepted Quantity Label
Excepted Quantity Label (LB-USL350N)

Where can I find packaging for UN3373 Category B Specimens and dry ice shipments?

At ICC we have a wide variety of packaging specifically designed for biological packaging as well as dry ice shippers for international shipments similar to the kit below:

[caption Continue Reading…