A Reminder – US Shipping Description Changes Becoming Mandatory for 2013

We’ve turned our clocks backwards, started our holiday preparations, and maybe even bought new calendars for 2013. But there’s one other thing that should be on our minds for the New Year, at least for shippers in the United States. We must make sure that our shipping descriptions are in order.

In 2006, a Final Rule, Docket No. PHMSA–06–25476, known as HM-215I, was issued by the Pipelines and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). The goal of this rule was to bring the US Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) of Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR) into line with the current UN Recommendations for Transport of Dangerous Goods. One major change was that the shipping description order, as described in 49 CFR section 172.202(a), would be rearranged to reflect the international standard.

Originally, the shipping description order was prescribed as:

  • Shipping name, hazard class, identification number and packing group (if applicable)

However, HM-215I changed this order to:

  • Identification number, shipping name, hazard class, and packing group (if applicable)

PHMSA recognized that making this change would take some time, and granted a six-year transition period. After all, making this change would include retraining workers who prepare or read shipping papers, reprogramming computerized document systems, and rewriting standard operating procedures regarding shipping papers. However, the transition period is reaching its end. Starting on January 1, 2013, shipping papers must be in the “identification Continue Reading…

Emergency Response Requirements for Shipping Papers

What information do you need on a shipping paper or an emergency response situation? Depending on the country you are shipping from, the answer can vary.

Canada

The Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations, Part 3, (1) 3.5(f) and (2) outlines the requirements for the shipping document.  These requirements include:

Having the words “24 hour number” followed by an active 10-digit telephone number xxx.xxx.xxxx,

  1. Being able to reach the consignor immediately, and
  2. Providing technical assistance without breaking the connection. An outside agency that is registered with the emergency response provider may be used.

USA

The requirements outlined in the 49 CFR  [172.201(d) and 172.604(b)(1)&/or(2)] states that if the shipper is using an Emergency Response Information provider or an agency on their behalf, a 24-hour telephone number and name of the person or contract number must be added to the Emergency Response Shipping paper.

Recently, an FAA inspector visited a customer of ours and the Emergency Response information on the shipping document was something they checked.  As part of their audit, they called the number listed on the form to verify that the contract number was indeed valid.

Remember, during a transport emergency, first responders rely on this information to react to the situation quickly and to react with the correct protective and fire-fighting measures.

Do you need a 24-hour emergency response service?

24-hour emergency number

ICC has a 24-hour phone number available in the USA, Canada and internationally.

Call us today: Continue Reading…