Danger Placard
DG on the Other Side of the World

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What’s wrong with these photos?

Well, nothing, if you consider where it was taken (a remote town in Thailand).

Even while on vacation, someone in the Dangerous Goods field is always on the lookout for dangerous goods in their environment. I know when I first joined ICC, I never noticed placards on trucks, but soon after it seemed like they were on every transport that passed by. Those blessed to be in our line of work have a heightened awareness for the dangers around us.

As we all know, regulations concerning dangerous goods differ around the globe. As much as we would like to think the regulations are harmonized, they’re really not. Enforcement is the same. There are only so many inspectors available compared to the number of shipments each day.

One has to wonder what training these workers have. Where are the transport labels, the Hazcom labels, and the blocking and bracing?

I feel a lot more comfortable knowing that shipments of gases in the US and Canada will be properly secured when transported, and they will always have proper labels. Regulations are in place for one reason, and that is to protect workers and the community.

ICC is your source for products, services, and training – all under one roof. Call us today.

Repacking Dangerous Goods
Shipping Laptops to Australia

Lithium Batteries, Laptop battery

Shipping Laptops Means Shipping Lithium Batteries

If you were to ship a laptop 5 years ago, all you would need to do was pack it up and ship it. Like shipping socks. But now that same laptop is considered a dangerous good due to the lithium battery it contains.

The Situation

I had a customer drop off 2 laptops going to Australia. He wanted me to prepare the shipment for air transport as he isn’t certified to ship dangerous goods via air. He said he received about 6 pallets of marine vessel equipment returning from Canada to Australia and he said someone put these 2 laptops in one of those pallets thinking it can all go as general cargo. He knew that there are restrictions on shipping lithium batteries via air so he knew he had to call in the expert!

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The Solution

I removed the battery from the laptop to see the watt hour rating. It was 41-watt hour and the total net quantity of lithium was below 5 kg (well below). Which meant these laptops are classified as Section II for UN3481, Lithium ion batteries contained in equipment; therefore, does not require a shipper’s declaration. It’s always good news for the client when it falls in Section II as it saves the client money.

I placed both laptops inside a good strong box (each laptop was initially Continue Reading…

Repacking Dangerous Goods
Shipping Different Dangerous Goods in One Package

Man preparing shipment

Q Value!

Now doesn’t that sound interesting. When you want to ship different dangerous goods in one outer packaging, you have to calculate something called a “Q value” using a formula. The Q value ordeal is only applicable to air shipments and seldom used as most prefer to put the dangerous goods in separate packaging.

Last week a customer requested to have 2 different dangerous goods packaged and shipped to Brazil via air. Since the quantities for each product was less than 200 ml I thought I might be able to apply the “Q” value and besides it’s always better to consolidate your shipment if you can to prevent loss/delay of packages. Especially this time of the year.

I ensured the dangerous goods met all the requirements of Section 5.0.2.11 of the IATA Regulation. I calculated the “Q” value and it was less than 1.0. So, everything seemed to be a go. For packaging, I used a 4GV box and lots of vermiculite to:

  1. separate the two dangerous goods and
  2. more than enough absorbent in case there was a leak (only one product was liquid)

Applied all the labels and markings, created the shipper’s declaration and added the Q value as required per Section 8.1.6.9.2(f), then shipped it out with Fedex.

I like to throw in a knuckleball once in a while and keep things Continue Reading…

ICC Top 10 List
10 Things That Might Put You on Santa’s Naughty List

Presents under the Christmas tree

Shipping Dangerous Goods During the Holiday Season

If you ask for any of these things for Christmas, Santa may not be happy. All of the items below are in one-way or another, regulated as Dangerous Goods under the IATA regulations, thus, they cannot simply be placed in Santa’s sleigh. I wonder if Santa has a Dangerous Goods Coordinator or is current on his training.

10. Perfume

Most perfumes are flammable. Santa may be able to use the Limited Quantity exemption, but it will still need a label and a completed Shipper’s Declaration form.

9. Oil-based paints

Hoping to get some paint from Santa this year? Paints are also flammable, and depending on the flashpoint and volume per package, may have to be shipped fully regulated.

8. Hoverboards

Asking for a hoverboard will certainly put you on the naughty list. Most hoverboards are manufactured in China, and many do not have Lithium Battery Test data (UN 38.3). Furthermore, depending on the Watt Hour rating, these may not even be able to be shipped in his sleigh!

7. Vanilla Extract

Hoping for some Vanilla to replenish your stock after making all those cookies for Santa? Vanilla, in its concentrated form is flammable. Let’s hope the bottle is small enough to get an exemption such as those under excepted, de minimis or limited quantity.

6. Nail Polish or Nail Polish Remover

It might be better to have your nails done Continue Reading…

Single Packaging
Change Notice: BX-8SP

In an effort to continuously improve the quality and performance of our UN packaging, we occasionally must make changes to the specifications and usage instructions. This notice is to inform you that the following changes have been made to BX-8SP.

  1. The maximum gross weight allowance for this design has been increased from 4.2 kg to 5.4 kg. The specification marking that is printed on the boxes has been updated to reflect this change.

Click here to view our packing instructions and certificate downloads »

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our customer relations center in the US at 888‐442‐9628 or in Canada at 888‐977‐4834.

Thank you,
Michael S. Zendano
Packaging Specialist

Regulatory Helpdesk: November 27, 2017

Top 4 Questions from the Regulatory Helpdesk

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. Here are some highlights from our helpdesk last week. Check back weekly, the helpdesk rarely hears the same question twice.

Lithium Battery Special Provision

Q. Why is only a reference to Packing Instruction Section IB required on a lithium battery Shipper’s Declaration – what about shipments made under Section I or IA?
A. Sections I and IA refer to fully regulated shipments so it’s redundant to indicate an authorization unless there’s a special provision deviation involved.

Although Section II shipments don’t require a Shipper’s Declaration document, if an airwaybill is used a notation must be made indicating the Section II status like “Lithium ion batteries in compliance with Section II of PI— CAO”.

This is particularly true for UN3090 or UN3480 where the document is required to indicate the CAO status.

Shippers also need to verify any listed state or operator variations that may require information over that mandate by IATA DGR.

Determining the Size of the Package

Q. I have a customer who wants a “portable tank” of product instead of our usual smaller sized containers, can I oblige?
A:

  • Characterize your product,
  • read the container supplier’s specification,
  • read the relevant regulation,
  • read the cited container standard; review 1. & 2. in the context of 3. & 4; decide on any required modifications.

Shipping Continue Reading…

Regulatory Helpdesk: November 20, 2017

Top 5 Questions from the Regulatory Helpdesk

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. Here are some highlights from our helpdesk last week. Check back weekly, the helpdesk rarely hears the same question twice.

Overpacks

Q. My shipment was refused even though I followed what the regulations and my training said for shipping an overpack. My drums were on a pallet and shrink wrapped. All of the information on the drums could be seen. I placed a sticker with the words “Overpack Used” on the shrink wrap and listed it that way on my paperwork. Can you tell me why my carrier refused it?

A. Per Section 7.1.7 the actual wording that must be used on your pallet is just the word “overpack”. It seems confusing to have different terminology used but that is how the regulations work and why you should be trained every 2 years for IATA.

Using Combustible Liquid, N.O.S. (USA)

Q. Since this product meets the combustible definition, can we use ‘NA1993 Combustible Liquids, n.o.s.’ to ship to Canada or does Canada only recognize the ‘UN1993 Flammable Liquids, n.o.s.’?

A. Basically, to me, she is asking what is the difference between NA1993 and UN1993 and how it impacts transporting into Canada. NA1993 is a US only identification number. It is used for transporting combustible liquids in the US.  Technically, a combustible liquid is NOT Continue Reading…

Single Packaging
Change Notice: BX-30CA

In an effort to continuously improve the quality and performance of our UN packaging, we occasionally must make changes to the specifications and usage instructions. This notice is to inform you that the following changes have been made to BX-30CA (PK-N2QTC/N2QTCA)

  1. The clear tape required for closure of this packaging has changed from 3M #305 48mm wide clear tape to 3M #375 48mm wide clear tape. This change to a stronger tape caused the box to perform better in drop tests, resulting in a more secure packaging.

Click here to view our packing instructions and certificate downloads »

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our customer relations center in the US at 888‐442‐9628 or in Canada at 888‐977‐4834.

Thank you,
Michael S. Zendano
Packaging Specialist

Single Packaging
Change Notice: BX-11SP, BX-10SP, and BX-87DU

In an effort to continuously improve the quality and performance of our UN packaging, we occasionally must make changes to the specifications and usage instructions. This notice is to inform you that the following changes have been made:

BX-11SP

  1. The maximum gross weight allowance for this design has been increased from 2.8 kg to 3.5 kg. The specification marking that is printed on the boxes has been updated to reflect this change.

BX-87DU

  1. The maximum gross weight allowance for this design has been increased from 24.3 kg to 25.2 kg. The specification marking that is printed on the boxes has
    been updated to reflect this change.
  2. The clear tape required for closure of this packaging has changed from 3M #305 48mm wide clear tape to 3M #375 48mm wide clear tape. This change to a stronger tape caused the box to perform better in drop tests, resulting in a more secure packaging.

BX-10SP

  1. The maximum gross weight allowance for this design has been increased from 16.0 kg to 18.5 kg. The specification marking that is printed on the boxes has been updated to reflect this change.

Click here to view our packing instructions and certificate downloads »

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our customer relations center in the US at 888‐442‐9628 or in Canada at 888‐977‐4834.

Thank you,
Michael S. Zendano
Packaging Specialist

Single Packaging
What About Cobb … Testing?

Splash drops of water on cardboard

What is Cobb Testing?

If you previously read my blog Anatomy of A box, you learned about the various components that make up a corrugated box. The construction of a box can become even more complicated for dangerous goods. Not only do you need to provide strong, durable corrugated boxes that can withstand drops and movement during transportation, but they must also be able to withstand various weather conditions including snow and rain.

How can box manufacturers and test labs ensure that dangerous goods packaging is safe to use when it gets wet? This is where the Cobb test comes in handy. This test helps determine the quantity of water that can be absorbed by the surface of paper or board in a given time. In this case, the less water that absorbs into the corrugated, the better. In fact as per § 178.516 of CFR 49 as well as TP 14850 7.8 this test is a requirement.

Cobb Testing

Why Cobb Testing?

Cobb tests are performed, because paper and fiberboard tend to attract and hold water molecules from the surrounding environment. The Cobb test is essential as it tests the ability of the paper to resist the penetration of water and quantity of water absorbed by the surface of fiberboard. If fiberboard absorbs too much water, the box may have difficulty maintaining strength and integrity. In fact, the inner fluting can Continue Reading…