IMDG
How Do You Ship Bullets? (IMO)

shipping bullets by ocean

What to do when you are moving and need to ship a whole lot of bullets?

98% of our repackaging clientele are businesses, but there are 2% of our clientele that are regular people. At least, this is how I refer to them. These folks are a “Mr. or Mrs. Smith” who have absolutely no idea about the dangerous goods world, but what they wish to send is considered dangerous goods. These folks are referred to us from carriers, freight forwarders, and sometimes by internet search results.

Recently I had a Mr. Smith call us to ask about packaging cartridges as recommended by his freight forwarder. He is moving to Europe and is packing up his entire house, which includes his firearms and the cartridges that go with them. He already had all his ducks in a row meaning his export/import documentation and certification for the firearms and whatever else was needed to ship the firearms and cartridges, but he needed to get the cartridges packaged up for transport. That’s where ICC comes in.

What Are We Really Dealing With?

Mr. Smith didn’t have any transport information such as UN number or shipping name. So, I asked him to email me pictures of the cartridges, because he mentioned they were all in their original retail packages. I was able to call the manufacturer directly and ask for the shipping info. Continue Reading…

A New Year, New Requirements for Identification Numbers

New shipping name labels sizes are required as of January 1, 2014

As the start of a new year approaches, it’s time for parties, resolutions – and to check our dangerous goods/hazmat procedures, and see what’s changing. If you are a shipper of non-bulk packagings, one thing to watch out for is the new size limit for identification numbers that will be introduced in many regulations for 2014.

Identification numbers (which cover UN numbers, NA numbers and ID numbers) are the main way for packages to be identified as to their contents, in a format that does not depend on language. In the past, incidents have occurred because these numbers were marked on dangerous goods packages, but were not large enough to be seen easily. Therefore, the United Nations has, in the UN Recommendations for Dangerous Goods, established minimum size requirements.

The size minimums are:

  • For packages with a capacity of 5 Litres or net mass of 5 kilograms or less, the size should be “an appropriate size,” based on the size of the container.
  • For packages containing more than 5 Litres or kilograms, up to  a maximum capacity of 30 Litres or net mass of 30 kilograms, the letters and numbers of the marking must be at least 6 millimeters (1/4 inch) tall.
  • For packages exceeding 30 Litres capacity, or 30 kilograms net mass, the letters and numbers of the marking must be at least 12 millimeters (1/2 inch) tall.

These size minimums will Continue Reading…

Single Packaging
Minimum Height of UN Numbers on Packages

Anatomy of a Box - UN Packaging

Update to UN Number Minimum Height

Are my eyes getting better with age or did something change? Something changed.

New to the regulations this year is a statement regarding the size of text on labels for dangerous goods. Both IATA (Air) and IMDG (Marine) have made changes to reflect the UN Model Regulation that become mandatory as of January 1st, 2014. Please reference “UN Model Regulations: 17th Edition; Section 5.2.1.1 (Vol 2. pg. 139)”, “IATA: 54th Edition; Section: 7.1.5.5 – Size (pg. 619)” and “IMDG Code: 2012 Edition; Section: 5.2.1.1 (Vol 1. pg. 244)” to find the following information.

As of January 1, 2014, mandatory size for “UN number” and letters “UN”:

UN Number Measurement

Some things to note:

  1. The way this is written is such that the UN number and letters “UN” MUST be at least the size specified above whereas other package markings SHOULD be that minimum size.
  2. Other package markings include the proper shipping name, technical name, the word “Overpack”, and any other markings.
  3. For IMDG, cylinders marked in accordance with the 2010 version of IMDG are acceptable until no later than July 1st, 2018 (and only if marked by December 31st, 2013), otherwise the sizing requirements must be followed.

New UN Number Measurements