IATA
Significant Changes and Amendments to the 59th Edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations

Download 2018 IATA 59th Edition Significant Changes

This year marks the 59th edition of the Dangerous Goods Regulations. The 59th edition becomes effective January 1, 2018. It is published by IATA and distributed by many, including ICC Compliance Center.

Highlights of the changes and amendments include:

  • Limitations have been adopted on the number of portable electronic devices (PED) and the number of spare batteries for the PED that may be carried by passengers or crew
  • There are a number of additions, deletions and amendments to variations submitted by operators
  • The classification section has been updated to bring in all substances and articles that are assigned to Class 9 with their respective UN numbers and proper shipping names
  • The “not restricted” conditions have been revised to require that the shipper provide written or electronic documentation stating that a flushing and purging procedure for flammable liquid powered engines has been followed.
  • The special provision that identifies that vehicles powered by an engine powered by both a flammable liquid and flammable gas must be assigned to the entry Vehicle, flammable gas powered.
  • New and amended packaging provisions for lithium batteries
  • New and amended packing instructions
  • Updated minimum size of UN numbers on the lithium battery mark
  • Update to the Handling table 9.3.A and the provisions of 9.3.2
  • Many Appendices have some form of change

Books are expected to be available late in Continue Reading…

IATA
Significant Changes and Amendments to the 58th Edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations

Download 2017 IATA 58th Edition Significant Changes

Some things are very predictable: Summer coming to an end, kiddos head back to school, and IATA publishes their list of Significant Changes and Amendments to their regulations.

This year marks the 58th edition of the Dangerous Goods Regulations. The 58th edition becomes effective January 1, 2017. It is published by IATA and distributed by many, including ICC Compliance Center.

Highlights of the changes and amendments include:

  • All amendments made by the ICAO Dangerous Goods Panel and the IATA Dangerous Goods Board
  • Operator responsibilities have been completely revised
  • Training requirements have been updated to include a Review and Approval
  • There are a number of state and operator variations that have been added, deleted and amended
  • The List of Dangerous Goods has been amended
  • New and amended special provisions
  • New and amended packing instructions
  • New marking and labeling, including the new Lithium Battery label and Class 9 Lithium Battery label that become voluntary January 1, 2017 and mandatory January 1, 2019
  • Clarification for identification numbers on multiple overpacks
  • Notes have been added under 9.0 to reference Annex 19 – Safety Management Systems and the ICAO Safety Management Manual.
  • All Appendices have some form of change

Books are expected to be available late in October. Visit our store for more information on our pre-sale discounts.

IATA
IATA Publishes Addendum II

A quote from IATA:

ICAO has now issued Addendum 4 to the 2015-2016 edition of the Technical Instructions to address the prohibition of lithium ion batteries, UN 3480, on passenger aircraft with effect 1 April 2016. As a consequence attached is the English addendum to the 57th edition of the Dangerous Goods Regulations. The language editions will follow early next week. There will also be updates to the eDGR and to the Lithium Battery Shipping Guidelines (LBSG) in all applicable languages. These should also be rolled out starting next week.

The 2016 edition of the lithium battery guidance document that was issued recently will be updated to include some specific guidance to shippers on how to determine the SoC of a lithium cell or battery and other questions that have emerged from the last addendum and the notice on the changes applicable to lithium batteries.

Note, there is no requirement for the shipper to specifically prove that lithium ion batteries shipped as UN 3480 are at 30% SoC, or for the operator to somehow verify that the lithium ion batteries are at no more than 30% SoC. The shipper by signing the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods is certifying that “I declare that all of the applicable air transport requirements have been met.” This is a legal declaration. This is no different to a shipper stating on the Shipper’s Continue Reading…

Toxic
The Zika Virus — Public Health Crisis and Regulatory Puzzle

Zika virus – the name itself sounds exotic and dangerous. It is believed to be a serious risk for pregnant women. And it’s due to arrive in North America. Just how great a danger is this virus, and how should research and medical facilities prepare for the regulatory burden?

First of all, Zika is not a new virus. It has been known since the 1950s in equatorial Africa and Asia, but only recently has it appeared to migrate to new territories, including South and Central America, the Caribbean and Mexico. It is primarily a mosquito-borne illness, transmitted by the Aedes genus of mosquitos. Possibly climate change has increased the populations of these mosquitos in the areas where Zika is spreading. Aedes mosquitos are found in some parts of the U.S., and although they are not currently believed to be in Canada, they may spread as the climate warms. Person-to-person transmission by body fluids is possible, but this would be relatively rare compared to the mosquito vector.

Zika is classed in the Flaviviridae family of viruses, along with dengue fever, West Nile virus and the notoriously dangerous yellow fever. However, compared to these, Zika is usually a mild affliction. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), only one in five persons infected with the virus shows any symptoms at all. For those who do fall ill, the symptoms Continue Reading…

IATA
IATA DGR 57th Edition Addendum I – January 2016

IATA has recently released their first addendum to the IATA DGR 57th Edition.

This is a quote from IATA:

ICAO has now issued their addendum to the 2015-2016 edition of the Technical Instructions to address the changes applicable to lithium batteries. As a consequence attached is the English addendum to the 57th edition of the Dangerous Goods Regulations. The language editions will follow early next week. There will also be updates to the eDGR and to the Lithium Battery Shipping Guidelines (LBSG) in all applicable languages. These should also be rolled out starting next week.

In addition to the changes for lithium batteries to require that, effective 1 April 2016, all lithium ion batteries shipped as UN 3480 under PI 965, Sections IA, IB and II must be at a state of charge (SoC) not exceeding 30%. For Section IA and IB of PI 965 there is provisions for shippers to have lithium ion batteries at a SoC of greater than 30%, but this requires an approval from the States of origin and of the operator.

The 2016 edition of the lithium battery guidance document that was issued recently will be updated shortly to include some specific guidance to shippers on how to determine the SoC of a lithium cell or battery.

Note, there is no requirement for the shipper to specifically prove that lithium ion batteries shipped as UN 3480 Continue Reading…

IATA
IATA DGR 57th Edition Addendum I – January 2016

IATA has recently released their first addendum to the IATA DGR 57th Edition.

This is a quote from IATA:

ICAO has now issued their addendum to the 2015-2016 edition of the Technical Instructions to address the changes applicable to lithium batteries. As a consequence attached is the English addendum to the 57th edition of the Dangerous Goods Regulations. The language editions will follow early next week. There will also be updates to the eDGR and to the Lithium Battery Shipping Guidelines (LBSG) in all applicable languages. These should also be rolled out starting next week.

In addition to the changes for lithium batteries to require that, effective 1 April 2016, all lithium ion batteries shipped as UN 3480 under PI 965, Sections IA, IB and II must be at a state of charge (SoC) not exceeding 30%. For Section IA and IB of PI 965 there is provisions for shippers to have lithium ion batteries at a SoC of greater than 30%, but this requires an approval from the States of origin and of the operator.

The 2016 edition of the lithium battery guidance document that was issued recently will be updated shortly to include some specific guidance to shippers on how to determine the SoC of a lithium cell or battery.

Note, there is no requirement for the shipper to specifically prove that lithium ion batteries shipped as UN 3480 Continue Reading…

Lithium
Back to the Future – Interim ICAO/IATA 2016 Lithium Battery Changes

In addition to changes documented in the IATA 2016 (57th Edition) DGR, and the anticipated 2017 changes outlined in Appendix H (“Impending Changes” to ICAO Technical Instructions), recent incidents with lithium batteries and lithium battery-powered small vehicles (e.g. “Solowheels”, hoverboards, mini-“Segway”, etc.) have caused regulators to re-examine changes and deadlines.

Specifically ICAO intends to require that, in 2016 (date to be confirmed, April 1 proposed):

  1. Lithium ion cells and batteries (UN3480, PI 965) must only be offered for transport when their “state of charge” (SoC) does not exceed 30 % of the rated capacity, as determined by the UN Manual of Tests & Criteria (Section I cells/batteries are only allowed to exceed 30% if the States of Origin & Operator approve in writing).
  2. Not more than 1 package prepared under Section II of PI 965 (UN3480) or PI 968 (UN3090) may be placed in an overpack
  3. Overpacks prepared as above must have both the lithium caution label and “overpack” mark visible.
  4. Packages prepared as above must be offered separately from other cargo and not be loaded into a unit load device (ULD) before being offered to the carrier.

These are interim measures while performance-based standards are developed for lithium batteries; and until changes to UN3481 andUN3091 (packed with/in equipment) take effect in 2017. Some or all of these interim measures may be retained in the future editions of Continue Reading…

IATA
Significant Changes to the 2016 IATA DGR 57th Edition

IATA has just released their list of significant changes to the new 2016 IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations 57th Edition.

Download Now (PDF) »


As always we continue to stay abreast of changes and updates to the regulations, and strive to keep providing you with new information. If you have any questions regarding this or any other dangerous goods regulation, please call our regulatory staff at 888.442.9628 (USA) or 888.977.4834 (Canada).

Overpack Label
“OVERPACK” Markings – Overdone?

The Issue

The formalization of the overpack concept into the Canadian TDG regulations has been the subject of concern for domestic shippers of dangerous goods due to the wording for fully regulated (TDGR 4.10.1) products. The wording implies that even when the DG safety marks for packages within the overpack are visible, the overpack must still have an “OVERPACK” mark displayed. This leads to some additional labelling requirements, particularly for shippers of stretch-wrapped pallet loads.

Definition

We’ll pause to review the concept of an overpack, consistent among the various regulations (e.g. TDG, UN Model Recommendations, IMDG, IATA, & 49 CFR).
An overpack is non-standardized packaging that:

  1. Is used for handling convenience (e.g. to reduce multiple handling- I.e. 4 drums on a skid, allowing loading 4 at once rather than 4 trips, or 6 small containers in a “non-spec” master carton, or 48 small boxes stretch wrapped on a skid; a keg (small drum) in a non-spec box for stability, etc. )
  2. Cannot be used as a replacement for inadequate, required “standardized” packaging
  3. Is to be unopened between consignor and receiver
  4. Cannot interfere with the integrity of the standardized packaging (e.g. banding cutting into boxes on a pallet)

The common principle requires that the description of DG that cannot be seen once the overpack is in place will be reproduced on the outside of the overpack.

However, this could be misleading in that Continue Reading…

Danger Placard
Remembering Placards

Mnemonic Devices

How do you remember the meaning of something? Do you try to KISS it where KISS stands for – Keep It Simple Silly? Do you use mnemonics from elementary school and even through college to trigger your memory? I do, and boy how they make things easier. I bet you can remember ROY G BIV, the colors of the rainbow from art class. Music class they gave us easy ways to remember the treble clef with Every Good Boy Does Fine for the lines on the staff and FACE for the spaces. One of my favorites however, is PEMDAS to help remember the order of operations in math!

I am always looking for a fun way to help reinforce my memory. In the hazardous transportation industry there are so many things to remember or define. Oh and the acronyms!

What is a Placard?

Let’s take a look at placards. What is a placard? As defined in the Merriam – Webster dictionary a placard is defined as:

a large notice or sign put up in a public place or carried by people

Placards provide pertinent information about an area, a specific instruction, or a hazard. Placards are used in work places to communicate to people of special operating procedures. Placards are also used in transportation to warn of hazards that are present in a truck on the road, in a rail Continue Reading…