OSHA Update
2 Million Plus Workers Get Protection From Deadly Dust! (Part 2)

Silicosis and OSHA Standards

As you may recall in my last blog, I spoke of a tragic story out of West Virginia. It was the Hawk’s Nest Industrial Incident and the repercussions on the people of that time in the 1930s. Up to date each year illness continues takes the lives of thousands of workers. One of these illness still present is caused by a deadly dust – crystalline silica which can cause Silicosis. It is approximated that 2.3 million people in the U.S. are exposed to silica at work. Over time workers have come to count on OSHA to adopt standards to be enforced in the workplace. These standards aid in the reduction of the risks to workers from contracting illness or injury in the workplace.

Let’s review what crystalline silica is. Crystalline silica is an important industrial material found largely in the earth’s crust and is commonly found in the likes of sand, stone, rock, concrete, brick, block, and mortar. It is found in materials that we see every day in the construction of roads, buildings, and sidewalks. Silica dust occurs in the workplace when operations involve cutting, sawing, drilling, and crushing of concrete, brick, block, rock, and stone. It can also be found among operations that use sand products, such as glass manufacturing, foundries, sand blasting, and hydraulic fracturing.

Crystalline silica (respirable) is hazardous to workers who Continue Reading…

OSHA Electrical Shock
National Electrical Safety Month – What Did You Do?

Electrical Safety Month is over, but Safety is Important Year Round

May marked the time of year for National Electrical Safety Month. What did you and/or your employer do to participate? Many Employers held toolbox talks on electrical hazards in their facilities or about the job performed by employees in the field. They may have done refresher training for their employees or, more simply, handed out an OSHA quick card.

Electrocutions are one of the fatal four for the construction industry. Among the General Industry Standards, multiple electrical standards made the top 10 most frequently violated and cited standards in 2014. The cited standards include: control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), electrical wiring methods for components and equipment, and electrical systems design under general requirements.

Working with electricity can be dangerous if someone is not trained properly. Most jobs require the use of an energy source. Electricity is the most typical type of energy usage. Such professions as engineers, linemen, electricians, and others work with electricity directly, including overhead power lines. Even though it may be indirect, office workers may also be exposed to electrical hazards.

OSHA’s electrical standard for general industry in the 29 CFR regulations for general industry in Subpart S, or starting at §1910.301. As a reminder on some of handling basics when dealing with live energy, you should use equipment that is approved to meet OSHA standards. You should not Continue Reading…

OSHA Safety
Stand-Down for What?

Updated injury and incident reports from OSHA

From Jan 1 to Dec 31, 2014 there were 5589 ladder incidents reported that have resulted in injury and even death according to OSHA. 14 incidents additionally reported for ladder hooks, 90 more for ladder jack scaffold and another 8840 incidents including death under fall protection. These numbers really just scratch the surface. There are many incidents that appear under other categories that involve ladders and falls. Fall incidents within the past month are presented in the table below. More information is available on OSHA’s website (http://www.osha.gov).

Date of Incident Preliminary Description of Incident Fatality or Catastrophe Inspection #
3/3/2015 Worker cleaning window killed in fall. Fatality 1044021
3/2/2015 Worker killed in fall through gap between jet and jet bridge. Fatality N/a
2/25/2015 Worker on stilts hanging drywall killed in fall. Fatality 1043899
2/24/2015 Worker killed in fall from manlift. Fatality 1042122
2/24/2015 Worker welding on steel decking killed in fall. Fatality 1042893
2/23/2015 Worker killed in fall on portable stairs. Fatality 102416049
2/22/2015 Worker on snow-covered roof killed in fall through skylight. Fatality 1042748
2/21/2015 Worker died after falling on showroom floor. Fatality 1042262
2/19/2015 Worker killed in fall from top of boat. Fatality 1041497
2/18/2015 Worker killed in fall from roof. Fatality 963192
2/18/2015 Worker killed in fall from flatbed trailer. Fatality 100367473
2/18/2015 Worker on roof killed in fall through skylight. Fatality 1041220
2/17/2015 Worker slipped and suffered fatal fall on ice. Fatality 1041590
2/17/2015 Worker clearing power lines from tree killed in fall from bucket lift. Fatality 1040571
2/16/2015 Worker fatally engulfed by gravel after falling into silo during cleaning operations. Fatality 1041096
2/12/2015 Worker killed in fall from ladder. Fatality N/a
2/12/2015 Worker killed in fall from ladder. Fatality N/a
2/10/2015 Worker killed in fall from steel structure. Fatality 1040413
2/10/2015 Worker killed in fall from Continue Reading…
What is the Cost of Doing Business Safely?

According to OSHA the Most Frequently Cited Standards


The following were the top 10 most frequently cited standards in fiscal year 2012 (October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012):

  1. Fall protection, construction (29 CFR 1926.501) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  2. Hazard communication standard, general industry (29 CFR 1910.1200) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  3. Scaffolding, general requirements, construction (29 CFR 1926.451) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  4. Respiratory protection, general industry (29 CFR 1910.134) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  5. Control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout), general industry (29 CFR 1910.147) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  6. Powered industrial trucks, general industry (29 CFR 1910.178) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  7. Electrical, wiring methods, components and equipment, general industry (29 CFR 1910.305) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  8. Ladders, construction (29 CFR 1926.1053) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  9. Machines, general requirements, general industry (29 CFR 1910.212) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]
  10. Electrical systems design, general requirements, general industry (29 CFR 1910.303) [related OSHA Safety and Health Topics page]

The following are the standards for which OSHA assessed the highest penalties in fiscal year 2012 (October 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012):

  1. Fall protection, construction (29 CFR 1926.501) [related OSHA Safety Continue Reading…
The Rulemaking Process

Have you ever been curious about how a rulemaking is published?  Have you ever wondered how you can participate in the rulemaking process?

We came across a link we want to share from The Office of the Federal Register. When you follow this link https://www.federalregister.gov/learn/tutorials, then scroll down to Tutorials, you will see A Guide to the Rulemaking Process containing answers to the questions below.

Gavel and books

Before the proposed rule

What gives agencies the authority to issue regulations?

How does an agency decide to begin rulemaking?

When can the public learn that an agency plans to start a rulemaking?

How does an agency involve the public in developing a proposed rule?

What is the role of the President in developing a proposed rule?

The proposed rule

What is the purpose of the proposed rule?

How is the proposed rule structured?

What is the time period for the public to submit comments?

Why do agencies re-open comments or issue multiple proposed rules?

Do agencies have additional options for gathering public comments?

Why should you consider submitting electronic comments?

Before the final rule

How do public comments affect the final rule?

What is the role of the President in developing a final rule?

The final rule

How is the final rule structured?

When do final rules go into effect?

Can an agency issue a final rule without publishing a proposed rule?

What are interim final rules and direct final rules?

After the final rule

How are final rules integrated into the CFR?

How is Continue Reading…