Regulatory Helpdesk: October 16, 2017

Top 5 Questions from the Regulatory Helpdesk

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. Here are some highlights from our helpdesk last week. Check back weekly, the helpdesk rarely hears the same question twice.

#5. Shipping Toxic Aerosols as a Limited Quantity by Sea (International)

Q. A customer wanted to know if shipping a toxic substance in an aerosol can be shipped as a limited quantity at 20 ounces per can as an inner package by sea? Also, the customer wanted to know what the limited quantity amount would be for UN1993 packing group III when shipping by sea.

A. I referred the customer to SP277 in the IMDG Code, which states “for aerosols or receptacles containing toxic substances, the limited quantity value is 120 ML”. In this case the customer can’t ship 20 ounces of a toxic substance in an aerosol can because this exceeds 120 ML. The limited quantity amount for UN1993 packing group III is 5L per the IMDG Code.

#4. Shipping Methyl Methacrylate (USA)

Q. I have a 2.5 liter metal container of UN1247, PG II, Methyl Methacrylate. The container is properly factory sealed. The container is then in its own “outer” box (but again, we don’t really look at that box). It’s like how cough medicine is in a bottle, but that bottle is then in an “outer” box on Continue Reading…

Regulatory Helpdesk: October 9, 2017

Top 4 Questions From the Regulatory Helpdesk

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. Here are some highlights from our helpdesk last week. Check back weekly, the helpdesk rarely hears the same question twice.

#4. Why is My Product X when it should be Y? (USA)

Q. Why is my product listed as a Flammable Liquid Category 4, when the product is combustible?

A. Under OSHA Hazcom 2012, a product that has a flashpoint >140°F and <199.4°F is considered a Flammable Liquid Category 4.

This is illustrated in the table below:

Table B.6.1: Criteria for flammable liquids

Table B.6.1: Criteria for flammable liquids
Category Criteria
1 Flash point < 23°C (73.4°F) and initial boiling point ≤ 35°C (95°F)
2 Flash point < 23°C (73.4°F) and initial boiling point > 35°C (95°F)
3 Flash point ≥ 23°C (73.4°F) and ≤ 60°C (140°F)
4 Flash point > 60°C (140°F) and ≤ 93°C (199.4°F)

Once you have the classification, then you can apply the label phrases. The Flammable Liquid Category 4 hazard statement is Combustible Liquid. This is outlined in the table below.

C.4.19 Flammable Liquids (Continued)
(Classified in Accordance with Appendix B.6)
Hazard Category Signal Word Hazard Statement
4 Warning Combustible Liquid

 


#3. Does my Class 6 placard need to show Class 6.1? (International)

Q. I have a customer who is saying that it is the regulation to have the 6.1 on the bottom of the placard … and not just the 6 in order to ship overseas. Is Continue Reading…

Regulatory Helpdesk: October 2, 2017

Top 4 Questions From the Regulatory Helpdesk

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. Here are some highlights from our helpdesk last week. Check back weekly, the helpdesk rarely hears the same question twice.

#4. Shipping Sodium (UN1428) by Air (USA)

Q. The Customer asked if Sodium (UN1428) can be shipped by air using a plastic bag as an inner container inside of a 4GV box.

A. Per the 49 CFR 172.102 Special Provision A20, Plastic Bags are not allowed to be used as inner receptacles in combination packaging by aircraft.


#3. When to Use Bilingual Packaging (Canada)

Q. Does every word on [my] packaging need to be in French and English to sell in retail stores in Canada?

A. Canada has the federal Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act and the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations. That Act and Regulation requires 2 mandatory items to be bilingual. Those items are the product identity, and the net quantity. The dealers name and place of business can be in either English or French according to those laws.

However, the guide specifically states: Subsection 6(2) of the Consumer Packaging and Labelling Regulations requires that “all” mandatory label information be shown in English and French except the dealer’s name and address which can appear in either language.

Any label information in addition to the mandatory requirements discussed above (i.e., directions for Continue Reading…

Regulatory Helpdesk: September 30, 2017

Answers from the Helpdesk

ICC supports our valued customers with access to our complimentary Regulatory Helpdesk. To further assist clients, we will be sharing some of the highlights of those calls each week. If you have a question, contact one of our regulatory specialists today.

#2. Certifier’s Signature (Canada)

Q: Can the 49 CFR certification statement be used on Canadian TDG shipping documents for shipments between two points in Canada, having only a signature for the certifier’s name?

A: TDGR 3.6.1(1)(a) does not restrict the use of the 49 CFR statement to US bound/origin shipments. TDGR 3.6.1(2), in conjunction with Transport Canada (TC) Safety Awareness Guidance Bulletin RDIMS#11829346 (August 2017), does not require that the individual’s name be a signature; but if a signature is used it must be clearly legible, identifying the individual, to be compliant.


#1. Refrigeration Regulation (USA)

Q: We need to ship a refrigeration unit (UN2857) that contains a small amount of non-flammable, non-toxic gas. How is this regulated?

A: In general, REFRIGERATING MACHINES, UN2857 are regulated as Division 2.2 dangerous goods, with no packing group. However, small units can usually be shipped as exempted dangerous goods, with no significant requirements, if they contain no more than 12 kg of non-flammable, non-toxic gas as a coolant, or no more than 12 Litres of ammonia solution.

For Canadian shipments under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations, this provision can be found in Part Continue Reading…