ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: May 7

IATA declaration, limited quantity labels, training requirements, and placarding

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Listing Overpack on a Declaration (IATA)

Q. Caller needed to clarify what should be listed on an IATA declaration for an overpack.  I have 2 overpacks of the exact same thing. The overpack is 2 drums inside an outer overpack box. Each drum holds 18.9 L. I have it listed as “Overpack Used x 2”. For the alphanumeric identifier for each it is “Box 1” and “Box 2”. How do I list the “total quantity per overpack”?
A. Take a look at Figure 8.1.L. It shows multiple identical overpacks. The example shows 200 boxes each with a weight of 0.2 kg in each overpack. It then lists the total quantity per overpack as 40 kg, which is the result of the 200 boxes multiplied by the 0.2 kg.

For her question then it would be 2 drums multiplied by the volume of 18.9 L. The total quantity per overpack is then 37.8 L.

Limited Quantity Labels

Q. Caller was on our website and had a question about LQ marks/labels. He has a distributor in Canada that will be shipping fire extinguishers to a location in the US from Canada. They use the LQ label in Canada Continue Reading…
ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: April 23

Using absorbents with variation packaging, UN marking height, limited quantity, and de minimis quantities

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Absorbent Materials in Variation Packaging

Q. Can I use absorbent padding instead of the vermiculite as the absorbent in a 4GV package that was tested with vermiculite?
A. Per the 49 CFR §178.601, the packaging must meet the standard to which it is certified and the material must be of the same type or design as used in the tested design type, in this case vermiculite. Therefore vermiculite would have to be used to comply with the regulations.

UN Number Height

Q. Is there a minimum size requirement for the UN number on a lithium battery mark?
A. The only place that a specific size requirement is referenced regarding the UN number on a lithium battery mark is in the IATA DGR – §7.1.5.5.2(b)- which states that the UN number “should be” at least 12 mm high.

None of the other common (49 CFR §173.185(c)(3)(i); IMDG §5.2.1.10; TDG §4.24; or UN Model §5.2.1.9) regulations quote a minimum UN number size specifically for the lithium battery mark. All of the regulations referenced allow for proportional reduction, of features without specified dimensions, when the authorized Continue Reading…

ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: April 16

WHMIS 2015 concentration ranges, training, overpacks, segregation and non-DG in DG packaging

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

New WHMIS 2015 Concentration Ranges

Q. There is a very specific list of approved concentration ranges listed in the CA regulations.  We had previously set up our ranges to be .1-10%, 10-20%, 20-30%, etc. (groupings of 10) and always included the “trade secret” caveat after our concentration list. Would this still be considered “compliant” for Canada, meaning using our ranges vs. their list of ranges?
A. There is a Regulatory Impact Assessment file that was sent out to stakeholders by Health Canada a couple days before the new amendment appeared in the Gazette II.

Under the comments received section of that file was the following:

Use of the prescribed ranges

One stakeholder agreed with the proposed amendment as it read in the context of the CGI publications, but asked for the following clarification: can smaller ranges be used if they (1) fall within an existing range, e.g. using 3.8-4.5% rather than 3-5% (as listed), or (2) when combining up to three prescribed ranges, e.g. combining ranges (e), (f), and (g) would be 5-30% but using 6-28% instead. Health Canada clarified that the prescribed concentration ranges are Continue Reading…

ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: April 2

How to determine if a product is regulated, SAPT on a SDS, Shipping a drone, and using a UN package

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Is my product regulated?

Q. I have 2 products I distribute to various stores to sell. The SDS files say my product is not regulated under DOT and TDG in Section 14. Since this is sold as a consumer product, doesn’t that mean it is regulated for IATA should I ship it via air? (the SDS were emailed to me)
A. Nothing in your SDS files leads me to believe either one would meet any of the 9 hazard classes in IATA. This is further confirmed by neither SDS classifying the products for DOT and TDG. Basically, what you have are containers of non-regulated liquids.  There is no need for UN Specification packaging or paperwork for IATA or any other transport regulation.

SAPT on my SDS

A. Since the addition of UN numbers for polymerizing substances, we’ve been told we must include the Self-Accelerated Polymerization Temperature (SAPT) on our SDS documents in Section 9. Is this a new requirement?
Q. There is no requirement in OSHA HazCom 2012 to include that particular data point in Section 9. All of the Continue Reading…
ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: March 26

Proper shipping name, 500 kg exemption, MANCOMM symbol, and a TDG error

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Proper Shipping Name (49 CFR)

Q. The customer wanted to know if they can print the product name in section 1 of the SDS next to the UN number on a hazard class label instead of the proper shipping name.

A. No. The proper shipping name on the outside of the box is a requirement per 49 CFR §172.301 (a) (1) and must be marked along with the UN number in a non-bulk packaging.

500 kg Exemption (TDG)

Q. Can I apply the 500 kg exemption when I have a mixed load where part of the load is excluded from using a DANGER placard under the 1000 kg Class restriction in TDGR §4.16 but the remainder is less than 500 kg gross? An example would be a consignment offered that included 1200 kg of Class 3, 100 kg of Class 8 and 300 kg of Class 9 (no ERAP required for either)?

A. In the DANGER placard scenario in 4.16, the Class 3 is restricted from using the DANGER placard specifically, based solely on quantity. Regular placarding requirements apply to the load based on the guidance text Continue Reading…

ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: March 19

Proper Shipping Name, Hydrostatic Pressure Tests, Other Information on the Lithium Battery Mark, and an Interesting Lithium Battery Story

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Proper Shipping Name for Lithium Batteries (IATA)

Q. Is it acceptable to print “Lithium Ion batteries packed in equipment” on a Class 9 Miscellaneous lithium battery label for UN3481 instead of Lithium Ion Batteries Contained in Equipment?
A. Yes. In the blue pages (Section 4) of IATA, you will notice there are 2 spots for UN number “3481”, one for lithium batteries containing equipment, and one for lithium batteries packed in equipment, so either of those printed on the label is acceptable.

Hydrostatic Pressure Test by Air (IATA)

Q. I plan on shipping an F-style container as an inner container in a combination package. Per IATA  §6.3.5.1, it says the internal pressure test is not required for combination packages. Does this mean the inner container doesn’t have to meet the 95 kPa pressure rating if shipping liquids by air?
A. Although IATA §6.3.5.1 does state the internal pressure test is not a required test for inner packagings of combination packages, it also references §5.0.2.9 for further instructions, which states that packaging for retention of liquid must be capable Continue Reading…
Regulatory Helpdesk: March 12

Combustible Liquids, Using Chemtrec’s Number, Keeping Up-To-Date, and Other Paperwork

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

DG Documentation on Overpacks

Q. If there are multiple skids of dangerous goods (overpacks) in a shipment on which one should the copies of the invoices and shipping papers be attached?
A. Neither the DOT nor IATA regulations tell you to put “paperwork” on the outer packages or overpacks. That is a carrier/driver thing. All the regulations care about is the proper marking and labeling that they require. You also have to be able to physically hand your paperwork to the carrier. Your best bet would be to talk to your carrier directly as to how they want it handled.

Combustible Liquids

Q. I have a liquid with a flashpoint of 100° F and it does not meet any other hazard classes. It is not an RQ, waste or marine pollutant. After manufacturing, it is placed in tubes and then shipped for sale in retail stores. What marks and labels are needed on the outside of the packages?
A. The flashpoint of this material is 100° F and there are no other hazards under the transport regulations. This means it technically meets the definition of a flammable liquid in Packing Group III per §173.120 Continue Reading…
Regulatory Helpdesk: March 5

Batteries, Batteries, and more Lithium Batteries

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Why do I need an SDS for a Laptop Battery?

Q. We are shipping used laptops with batteries in the units from the US to HK via air. There are multiple manufacturers and models, are (M)SDS sheets required for each model? Our forwarder is requesting them in order to provide pricing.
A. To answer your question, it would depend on why the forwarder is requesting them. They may be asking for them to meet the written emergency response requirements. However, they could be asking for them for classification purposes to prove which part of the packing instructions these meet.

The SDS could tell them the watt-hour rating which would then drive which part of the instruction to use. Forwarders and carriers have a lot of leeway. I can only speak to what the regulations say. There is nothing in 49 CFR or IATA that indicates you must use an SDS. Most people tend to default to them because they meet so many parts of the regulations in one place.

Manufacturer’s Packaging (Lithium Battery)

Q. Should I remove the manufacturer’s packaging from lithium ion batteries being shipped by air under PI 965 Continue Reading…
Regulatory Helpdesk: February 19 & 26

Shipments to Puerto Rico, Non-hazardous substances, the Overpack label, and Aviation Regulated Liquids or Solids

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Shipping to Puerto Rico

Q.  If 49 CFR is used to make a vessel shipment of limited quantities from the mainland US to Puerto Rico is a shipping paper required? I’m asking because limited quantities don’t require shipping papers.

A. Technically that is true. Shipping papers are not needed for US GROUND shipments. You have to read the fine print in paragraph 173.150(b) which is the section on limited quantities for flammable and combustible liquids. It that paragraph it says, ” … is not subject to the shipping paper requirements of subpart C of part 172 of this subchapter, unless the material meets the definition of a hazardous substance, hazardous waste, marine pollutant, or is offered for transportation and transported by aircraft or vessel, and is eligible for the exceptions provided in §173.156 of this part“.

Non-hazardous substances under WHMIS 2015

Q.Customer called and asked if SDS’s were required for non-hazardous substances and where to find this in the WHMIS 2015 Regulations?

A.The answer to your question can be found below in WHMIS 2015, which states that safety data sheets only pertain to a hazardous product, therefore Continue Reading…

Regulatory Helpdesk: February 12

Lithium Batteries, Placards, and SDS in the Workplace

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Lithium Batteries (Air)

Q. For PI 967 in IATA is the weight limit the weight of the equipment and battery inside of it or just the battery.
A. For all battery packing instructions in IATA it is always the weight of the battery itself.

Lithium Batteries (IMDG)

Q. Do “excepted” batteries require segregation from limited quantity packages under IMDG?
A. Under IMDG §3.4.4.2 it tells you that segregation requirements in Chapters 7.2 – 7.7 plus any information on Stowage in column 16b of the table do not apply to goods in limited quantity packages. Lithium ion batteries do not yet need segregation under IMDG either. It is only IATA that has implemented segregation this year as part of the packing instructions for shippers. IATA has also added batteries to the segregation table for operators, but it isn’t mandatory until next year and only applies to those in Section 1A and 1B not Section II.

Placards (TDG)

Q. Customer asked if his Class 8 material (UN 1830) needed to have a UN number on the placard if shipping 1 liter per package and 7 per tote for a total of 17 Liters for the shipment in Canada. Continue Reading…