World Hepatitis Day

Since 2010, World Hepatitis Day is observed on July 28th.  The goal is to raise awareness of hepatitis as well as the prevention and treatment of the disease.  According to the World Health Organization (WHO), hepatitis cause two in every three liver cancer deaths and overall 1.34 million deaths a year.  We all need to be educated.  This is not a disease found in just one country, a particular ethnicity or age.  Here is the chance to educate ourselves. 

Hepatitis is the inflammation of liver tissue.  It is most commonly caused by a virus and there are five main ones commonly referred to as Types A, B, C, D and E.  Types A and E are usually short-term (acute) diseases.  Types B, C, and D are likely to become chronic.  Type A is contracted by direct contact with fecal matter or drinking water contaminated with fecal matter.  that has the virus in it.  Type E is the result of indirect contact with fecal contaminated food and water.  This is why many people are under the misconception that you can only get hepatitis in 3rd world countries where sanitation is not the best.  Types B and C are caused by contact with an infected person’s bodily fluids such as blood. Type D can only happen if someone is currently infected with Type B.

This year’s theme is to “Find Continue Reading…

Eureka Moment with Batteries

Every year when teaching the concept of density to high schoolers, I would use the story of Archimedes and the king’s crown. They really enjoyed the part of him running naked through the streets shouting, “Eureka, I have found it.” Since that time, the concept of “eureka moments” has become a thing. The moment you finally realize, understand, or discover something is a “eureka moment”.

My most recent one occurred while updating ICC’s lithium battery courses. You see, I’ve always struggled with a few paragraphs in 49CFR 173.185. The paragraphs in question are (c)(1)(iii) and (c)(1)(iv) for those smaller or “excepted” cells and batteries. My brain just couldn’t comprehend or truly understand what they were telling me. Add to that the changes brought in by the interim final rule HM-224I and my brain was just fried. Both paragraphs are shown below for your reference.

173.185(c)(1)(iii)
Except when lithium cells or batteries are packed with or contained in equipment in quantities not exceeding 5 kg net weight, the outer package that contains lithium cells or batteries must be appropriately marked: “PRIMARY LITHIUM BATTERIES—FORBIDDEN FOR TRANSPORT ABOARD PASSENGER AIRCRAFT”, “LITHIUM METAL BATTERIES—FORBIDDEN FOR TRANSPORT ABOARD PASSENGER AIRCRAFT”, “LITHIUM ION BATTERIES—FORBIDDEN FOR TRANSPORT ABOARD PASSENGER AIRCRAFT” or labeled with a “CARGO AIRCRAFT ONLY” label specified in §172.448 of this subchapter.

173.185(c)(1)(iv)
For transportation by highway or rail only, the lithium content of the cell Continue Reading…

PHMSA Announces Public Meeting to Solicit Input for 2020 Emergency Response Guidebook

On May 7, 2019, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration announced there will be a public meeting scheduled for June 17, 2019 to solicit input on the development of the 2020 edition of the Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG). During the June 17 meeting, PHMSA will discuss different ways to determine the appropriate response protective distances for poisonous vapors resulting from spills involving dangerous goods considered toxic by inhalation in the “green pages” of the 2016 ERG. PHMSA will also discuss new methodologies and considerations for future editions of the ERG and outcomes of field experiments including ongoing research to better understand environmental effects on airborne toxic gas concentrations and other updates that will be published in the 2020 ERG. The 2020 ERG will be published in English, French, and Spanish and will increase public safety by improving emergency response procedures for hazardous material incidents across North America. For more information on how to be a part of the public meeting visit the link below:

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2019/05/07/2019-09299/hazardous-materials-public-meeting-notice-for-the-2020-emergency-response-guidebook-erg2020

PHMSA first published the ERG Guidebook in 1973 for use by emergency services personnel to provide guidance for first responders during the critical first 30 minutes of hazardous materials transportation incidents. Since 1980, PHMSA’s goal has been to provide free access of the ERG to all public emergency response personnel including fire-fighters, police, and rescue squads. PHMSA has distributed more than 14.5 Continue Reading…

Transport Canada Launches Video: Responding to Rail-Car Incidents Involving Flammable Liquids

When a train carrying flammable liquids is involved in an incident, first responders are often the first on scene. These types of incidents are not typical for first responders. They require a unique approach. And for that reason, Transport Canada has put out a video on how to respond to rail-car incidents that involve flammable liquids. Below are the factors and steps from the video when dealing with these types of incidents.

Situation:

A Rail Car is involved in an accident and a fire starts on impact.  The rail car is properly placarded with the appropriate class 3 flammable Placard. Below are the factors that can influence the fire as well as steps and tools to utilize during the incident. 

Factors:

Whether it’s Gasoline, Diesel, Ethanol, Crude oil, or bitumen, knowing the properties of each is important to first responders because all can behave differently under spill and fire conditions.  This is where the importance of proper placarding will come into play as first responders can detect exactly what type of flammable substances are on the train based on the UN number.   Below are important factors of flammable substances that would help first responders determine the proper course of action:

Viscosity- Gives an indication on how fast the fire can spread.

Density- Will determine if substance will sink or float if it is near a body of water.

Flashpoint- Tells how easily the Continue Reading…

Transport Canada Updates ERAP Requirements

On May 1, 2019, Transport Canada issued an amendment to Part 7 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations (TDG). This part covers the requirements for Emergency Response Assistance Plans, or ERAPs. Details can be found at http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p2/2019/2019-05-01/pdf/g2-15309.pdf.

ERAPs are unique to Canada, and are intended to ensure support for local responders in catastrophic spills, such as the 2013 Lac-Mégantic derailment. Essentially, they require consignor of significant amounts of high-risk dangerous goods to establish a specific protocol, often involving an on-call response team, that can assist local responders in case of a release. Transport Canada must review and approve the plan before the consignor can offer or import affected shipments (although the approval only has to be issued once.)

The amendment has three main goals:

  • clarify ERAP implementation and reporting;
  • enhance emergency preparedness and response; and
  • make housekeeping changes that address smaller issues.

The amendment replaces all the text of Part 7, although unamended requirements will remain the same. Changes also occur in Parts 1, 3 and 8.

Clarifying Implementation of ERAPs

The original requirements of Part 7 didn’t go into any detail as to how an ERAP would be implemented – presumably it would be by emergency responders or by the person with control of the released material, but it’s never been established precisely. The amendment addresses initial notification of an accident requiring ERAP response, and clarifies that the person with the ERAP Continue Reading…

Lithium ION Battery Phrase Confusion with HM-224I

Laurel and Hardy the comedy duo from the 1930’s coined the phrase, “Well, here’s another nice mess you’ve gotten me into.” Sadly, I believe this is the situation DOT created with HM-224I which is an interim final rule published in March.  When this new rule is taken into account along with the general frustration many shippers face when shipping lithium batteries, it is easy to see how the mess was made.

Basically, here’s what happened.  The 49 CFR can be used to make air shipments along with going by ground and vessel.  In the “old” version of the regulations, you were allowed to put lithium ion batteries on passenger planes as long as the net weight of the batteries was below 5 kg.  Well, DOT has finally admitted it is NOT a good idea to put lithium ion batteries on passenger aircraft.  They also wanted to be in closer alignment with the IATA which restricted ion batteries to cargo planes just a few years ago.  This is where HM-224I comes into play.

One of the biggest changes is the addition of a phrase to section 173.185 for small powered or excepted batteries.  It is paragraph (c)(1)(iii) that is causing the most trouble.  Keep in mind nothing changed with the existing phrases in this paragraph. It is simply a matter of a new one being added.  Also, this paragraph Continue Reading…

International World Day for Safety and Health at Work

The International Labour Organization (ILO) was created in 1919.  It is a United Nation’s agency that sets standards, policies and programs for the work force.  Comprised of workers, employers and governments the main goals are to “promote rights at work, encourage decent employment opportunities, enhance social protection and strengthen dialogue on work-related issues.”  Each branch, if you will, has equal footing in regards to what programs and actions are implemented.  

Starting in 2003, the ILO started “International Worker’s Memorial Day” as a way to bring awareness to workers and the workplace including accidents, diseases, safety and health.  It has evolved into the “International World Day for Safety and Health at Work” and is celebrated every year on April 28.  This date also coincides with the International Commemoration Day for Dead and Injured Workers. 

Since the ILO is celebrating 100 years of existence in 2019, they are looking back at what the past 100 years and using that experience to look at the current and future workplace.  The theme to this year’s event is “A Safe and Healthy Future of Work: Building on 100 Years of Experience”.  There is a fantastic video on the ILO site found here that focuses on this year’s theme.  The longer report covers the changes to the workforce overtime and what are some of the upcoming changes.  The numbers in it are staggering when viewed from a global perspective.  It is well worth the read and is free to download.

Thinking about how Continue Reading…

TDG “INTERNATIONAL HARMONIZATION UPDATE” (IHU) CONSULTATION

IHU 2019 Proposed Amendment: Pre-Gazette I Consultation

In late March, Transport Canada posted a notice on their public website regarding a pre-Gazette I consultation on proposed amendments to the TDGR. The consultation was distributed to selected stakeholders by email on March 4.

This proposal is the latest in a series of international harmonization updates (“IHU”) to incorporate changes to reflect the current editions of the UN Model Regulations (UN Recommendations), ICAO Technical Instructions for air, and the IMDG Code for ocean shipment. In addition, the Canada-US Regulatory Cooperation Council work planning effort has suggested several items that would facilitate reciprocity in shipping dangerous goods between the two countries.

UN Recommendations

  • Updating to 20th edition and preparation for 21st edition.
  • Incorporate packaging updates by adopting 3rd edition TP14850 (pending repatriation to CGSB as standard CGSB-43.150-xx), normalize EC-allowed practices on batteries; allow UN3175 in FIBC 13H3 & 13H4.
  • Marking/Labeling: text on labels, banana labels on cylinders, require orientation arrows for liquids, marine pollutant, and Lithium Battery Mark on overpacks.
  • Language issues under review, include determining the options on the use of either or both English/French and circumstances when a different second language might appear (i.e. foreign sourced material).

Placarding

  • Consider adding provisions for optional hazard class text on placards – see also marking/labeling.
  • Allow US placards for re-shipping road/rail within Canada. In addition to text issues, this would allow re-shipping with US Continue Reading…
OSHA HazCom 2012
OSHA Stance on Wearable Lithium Batteries

Here’s the thing. I am a TV junkie. A huge amount of my time has been dedicated to researching new shows, setting them up on my DVR, and watching said shows. One that has my attention right now is “The Rookie” starring Nathan Fillion. In the show, he is a 40-year old rookie cop in Los Angeles. It has my attention for multiple reasons aside from the obvious. The main REGULATORY one is the fact that every officer on the show wears a body camera. It got me to thinking … surely those body cameras come with rechargeable batteries. If so, what happens when in the course of the show, one of those cameras is damaged? My brain then jumped to what about workers who wear battery powered devices.

Believe it or not, OSHA recently published in their newsletter an article called, “Preventing Fire and/or Explosion Injury from Small and Wearable Lithium Battery Powered Devices”. You can find the article at https://www.osha.gov/dts/shib/shib011819.html.

In this article, they do a good job describing batteries and cells as well as how they work. There is also a lengthy section on lithium battery hazards including what can cause enough damage to create fire and explosion risks. These include such things as physical impacts, usage/storing at temperatures too high or too low and failure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

As to ways to prevent injuries Continue Reading…

USPS Regulations and Updates
New USPS Mailing Standards for Mailpieces Containing Liquids and How ICC Can Help

The US Postal Service is taking a positive step to improve the safety of liquid packaging shipments. This step is significant, as the industry will begin to incorporate some components of UN 4GV combination packaging requirements among a wide variety of changes soon to be implemented. Here at ICC, we help you understand what these changes are and provide the solutions that ensure you meet these new stringent requirements.

Why Change?

The Postal Service has observed that a significant percentage of liquid spills results from mailers misinterpreting the existing packaging requirements for liquids, thinking their non-metal containers are not breakable. However, non-metal containers (i.e., plastic, glass, earthenware, etc.) are often the source of liquid spills in Postal Service networks. As a result, on July 9th of 2018, the US Postal Service proposed a new rulemaking on standards for mail pieces containing liquids. There was a comment period requesting public feedback on the proposed rules until September 18, 2018.

The proposed rule addressed two components:

  1. Clarification of existing language that specified packaging and markings for mail pieces that contain liquids in containers greater than 4 fluid ounces; and
  2. Extending the triple-packaging requirement for breakable primary containers with 4 ounces or less.

What are the Changes and the Compliance Solutions?

Effective on March 28, 2019, the adopted changes published in the final rule include: