Motorcycles – Yes, They are Dangerous Goods

If you are feeling “Born to Be Wild” – Steppenwolf and looking to race down life’s highway on two wheels this summer, but short on time, or looking for an even better adventure across the pond, fly your bike and meet it there.

Wait! You can’t just show up at the airport and check in your motorcycle. Did you know that a motorcycle is considered to be a dangerous good? Under the IATA regulations, a motorcycle is classified as UN 3166, Vehicle flammable liquid powdered, hazard class 9; and therefore needs a shipper’s declaration form.

What does this mean to the average motorcycle enthusiast? It means that you need to seek the advice of a dangerous goods consultant, who specializes and can assist in providing instruction on the preparation of the motorcycle, and provide the proper signed shipper’s declaration.

According to Air Canada, some of the requirements at time of tender include:

  • The fuel tank must be drained as far as practical; and fuel must NOT exceed ¼ of the tank capacity
  • All batteries must be installed and securely fastened in the battery holder of the vehicle and be protected in such a manner as to prevent damage and short circuits
  • Spare key, to be left in the ignition
  • Alarm (theft-protection devices, installed radio communications equipment or navigational systems must be disabled
    Air waybill number (booking number)
  • Saddle bags may be filled with equipment, parts, etc. An itemized list of the content of the saddle bags must be provided at time of tender.
  • Personal effects such as a clothing, toiletries and luggage cannot accompany the motorbike. (Dangerous goods such as lubricants, spray paints etc. must be left behind)

ICC Compliance Center offers declaration services across Canada, and can work with you to find a consultant in other countries as well. Contact us at least 2 weeks before you plan to start your adventure.

Have fun and contrary to the opening statement, no racing! Simply stay safe enjoy the sun on your face and the wind in your hair!

OSHA Update
What is the Significance of June 1st?

What significance does June 1st have in the world of hazardous materials?

Hopefully this does not come as a surprise, but it is the deadline for the final implementation date for Hazcom 2012.

Effective Completion Date Requirements Who
December 1, 2013 Train employees on the new label elements and safety data sheet (SDS) format. Employers
June 1, 2015 or December 1,2015 Compliance with all modified provisions of this final rule, except:The Distributor shall not ship containers labeled by the chemical manufacturer or importer unless it is a HCS Compliant label Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors and employers
June 1, 2016 Update alternative workplace labeling and hazard communication program as necessary, and provide additional employee training for newly identified physical or health hazards. Employers

In March 2012, OSHA aligned the HCS (Hazard Communication Standard) with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS). This kicked off a four-year phase-in period which is now officially over.

By now, all chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors, and employers in the USA should have switched from OSHA 1994 to Hazcom 2012. This includes training all employees, classifying all products to the Hazcom 2012 criteria, creating Hazcom 2012 Safety Data Sheets (SDS), creating compliant shipped container labels, and finally updating workplace labeling and written safety programs to Hazcom 2012 standards.

Our handy checklist can help ensure that you have completed each important step. Use it as part of your internal auditing practice to ensure compliance.

If you still need help complying with the updated standard, give us a call. We can assist with consulting and training, safety data sheet and label development, and finally providing printing services to ensure those shipped container labels and workplace labels are in place.