Regulatory Helpdesk: December 4, 2017

Top 4 Questions from the Regulatory Helpdesk

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. Here are some highlights from our helpdesk last week. Check back weekly, the helpdesk rarely hears the same question twice.

IMDG Editions

Q. What edition of the IMDG should I be using?

A. The customer would still need the 38th edition to get him through all of next year. The new 39th edition will be published at the end of 2018 but it can’t be used at all until Jan 1, 2019. Even then the 38th is still a viable option.

IMDG Transition Timeline
IMDG Transition Timeline

Placement of the Consignor’s Certification Statement

Q. Can the Consignor’s certification appear on a second page or on the back of the shipping document?

A. Yes, if there is no other non-DG information intervening when using the phrase in TDGR 3.6.1(1)(a). This phrase requires that the certification appear below the information specified in 3.5. The Transport Canada FAQ page indicates that the “consignor’s certification may appear on the back of the shipping document as long as it is after the information required under Section 3.5“.

Limited Quantities Under IMDG

Q. Can limited quantity provisions be used to ship under the IMDG Code?

A. Yes, but you should have IMDG Code training or consider a re-packing service if you are not trained, since the requirements are not the Continue Reading…

Regulatory Helpdesk: November 6, 2017

Top 4 Questions from the Regulatory Helpdesk

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. Here are some highlights from our helpdesk last week. Check back weekly, the helpdesk rarely hears the same question twice.

Equivalent Exemption (Canada & US)

Q. What is the  US “equivalent” to TDGR Part 1 Special Case 1.33?

A. The reference is found in 49 CFR§173.150. Essentially the US says that, with conditions, a low risk flammable liquid may be “reclassified” as a combustible liquid; & combustible liquids may be exempted when in non-bulk packaging. Before using the exemption, also check the following:

  1. Verify that the actual ingredients don’t trigger the (US only) “RQ” requirement to classify as “hazardous substance” or “marine pollutant” designation which will negate the exemption under (f)(2).
  2. Verify that there is no subsidiary hazard class which would negate the exemption (US (f)(1) & TDG 1.33(a)).

Organic Peroxide Shipped by Ocean

Q. Can you confirm the packing group for UN3104 with Dibenzoyl Peroxide for IMDG?

A. UN3104 is Organic Peroxide Type C, solid. This is a class 5.2 material that does not have a packing group. However, Chapter 2.5 should be reviewed as well as Packing Instruction P520 and packing methods OP6.

A Spill Involving a Limited Quantity

Q. If I have a product being shipped in Limited Quantity, it’s not considered as being dangerous any more? So if there is Continue Reading…

Regulatory Helpdesk: October 9, 2017

Top 4 Questions From the Regulatory Helpdesk

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. Here are some highlights from our helpdesk last week. Check back weekly, the helpdesk rarely hears the same question twice.

#4. Why is My Product X when it should be Y? (USA)

Q. Why is my product listed as a Flammable Liquid Category 4, when the product is combustible?

A. Under OSHA Hazcom 2012, a product that has a flashpoint >140°F and <199.4°F is considered a Flammable Liquid Category 4.

This is illustrated in the table below:

Table B.6.1: Criteria for flammable liquids

Table B.6.1: Criteria for flammable liquids
Category Criteria
1 Flash point < 23°C (73.4°F) and initial boiling point ≤ 35°C (95°F)
2 Flash point < 23°C (73.4°F) and initial boiling point > 35°C (95°F)
3 Flash point ≥ 23°C (73.4°F) and ≤ 60°C (140°F)
4 Flash point > 60°C (140°F) and ≤ 93°C (199.4°F)

Once you have the classification, then you can apply the label phrases. The Flammable Liquid Category 4 hazard statement is Combustible Liquid. This is outlined in the table below.

C.4.19 Flammable Liquids (Continued)
(Classified in Accordance with Appendix B.6)
Hazard Category Signal Word Hazard Statement
4 Warning Combustible Liquid

 


#3. Does my Class 6 placard need to show Class 6.1? (International)

Q. I have a customer who is saying that it is the regulation to have the 6.1 on the bottom of the placard … and not just the 6 in order to ship overseas. Is Continue Reading…

Regulatory Helpdesk: September 30, 2017

Answers from the Helpdesk

ICC supports our valued customers with access to our complimentary Regulatory Helpdesk. To further assist clients, we will be sharing some of the highlights of those calls each week. If you have a question, contact one of our regulatory specialists today.

#2. Certifier’s Signature (Canada)

Q: Can the 49 CFR certification statement be used on Canadian TDG shipping documents for shipments between two points in Canada, having only a signature for the certifier’s name?

A: TDGR 3.6.1(1)(a) does not restrict the use of the 49 CFR statement to US bound/origin shipments. TDGR 3.6.1(2), in conjunction with Transport Canada (TC) Safety Awareness Guidance Bulletin RDIMS#11829346 (August 2017), does not require that the individual’s name be a signature; but if a signature is used it must be clearly legible, identifying the individual, to be compliant.


#1. Refrigeration Regulation (USA)

Q: We need to ship a refrigeration unit (UN2857) that contains a small amount of non-flammable, non-toxic gas. How is this regulated?

A: In general, REFRIGERATING MACHINES, UN2857 are regulated as Division 2.2 dangerous goods, with no packing group. However, small units can usually be shipped as exempted dangerous goods, with no significant requirements, if they contain no more than 12 kg of non-flammable, non-toxic gas as a coolant, or no more than 12 Litres of ammonia solution.

For Canadian shipments under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations, this provision can be found in Part Continue Reading…

Lithium
Lithium Battery Labels as of August 1, 2017

Lithium Batteries, Laptop battery

The A-Team and Lithium Battery Marks / Labels

An iconic show from the 1980’s was “The A-Team”. It was about a group of former military men who worked to help those in need by using their former skill set. A famous line from it was often said by John “Hannibal” Smith, played by George Peppard. At the end of many episodes he would say, “I love it when a plan comes together”. With the publication of Transport Canada’s Amendment TDGR SOR2017 – 137, we finally have a plan coming together for the transportation of Lithium Batteries.

Finally, all transport regulations – 49 CFR, TDG, IATA .and IMDG – are on the same page regarding the necessary marks and labels needed for transporting Lithium Batteries. All of the regulations even have the same transition times for when the new Class 9 Lithium Battery Hazard Class Label and new Lithium Battery Mark will be mandatory.

New lithium battery label     New Lithium Battery Mark and Pictogram

Download Our Lithium Battery Labels Guide

 

Let ICC Compliance Center be your “A-Team” for shipping Lithium Batteries. Call us today for packaging, training, labels and marks.  We have it all.

OSHA Safety
Compliance Language

Current Dangerous Goods Regulations

Terminology in Regulatory Manuals

Language, as defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary, is the formal system of words or signs that people use to express thoughts and feelings. Learning a new language is often a complex undertaking. It is also a time that lends itself to funny stories. While living in Austria for a few years taking German lessons was part of our visa process. We were encouraged to practice often. On one of my first attempts was to buy a certain pretzel. Somehow my request came out as asking for the “slow one” rather than the “long one”. My husband told a co-worker he “believed” he was a pencil. While neither request caused harm, it was confusing to the German speakers who heard us. I mention this because the language of transport regulations can be confusing as well until you have a good handle on the language used in them.

Let’s take a look at two simple words. We will compare their “everyday” usage with how they are used for transporting hazardous materials or dangerous goods. The two words will be “should” and “may”.

Word #1: Should

In normal usage, this word indicates certain obligations or expectations. Take for example the statement, “John should be ready by now.” By using the word “should” in the sentence, the expectation is that John is ready or prepared for whatever situation he finds himself. In Continue Reading…

PHMSA Update
A Small Victory for Harmonization … For Now (HM-215N)

PHMSA Withdraws Final Rule

—PHMSA Update HM-215N

The Pipelines and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) of the Department of Transportation (DOT) has withdrawn a Final Rule that was intended to be published in the Federal Register on January 26.

The Final Rule, HM-215N, would have updated the U.S. “Hazardous Materials Regulations” to reflect international standards. This was due to the new administration’s Regulatory Freeze executive memorandum, issued January 20, 2017.

Harmonization

HM-215N would have harmonized the 49 CFR regulations to the latest version of the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, the ICAO Technical Instruction’s on the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods, the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code.

New lithium battery label     New Lithium Battery Mark and Pictogram
New marks and labels introduced in the upcoming international regulations.

 

This delay has made it particularly confusing for shippers of lithium batteries, who have transitioned to the new handling mark, and hazard class 9 label, shown in these international regulations.

Usage

Last week, PHMSA issued a Notice that allows offerors and carriers to use the 2017-2018 versions of the international regulations without fear of enforcement. In addition, it is allowing users to mark and label packages in accordance with either the 2015-2016 or 2017-2018 IATA/ICAO and IMDG regulations.

This notice is limited to 49 CFR Parts 171.4(t) and (v). This notice is expected to be in place until HM-215N is release, or this notice is otherwise rescinded or otherwise modified.

For a full version of the Continue Reading…

Lithium
Lithium Battery Labels as of Feb 1, 2017

Lithium Batteries, Laptop battery

UPDATE: The download link has been updated to current regulatory standards for August 1, 2017.

Please see: Lithium Battery Marks and Labels August 2017

Both 49 CFR and TDG are expecting to harmonize lithium battery labels into the regulations; however, both regulations are pending. HM-215N (49 CFR) was recalled, and will not be reissued for at least 60 days.

Transport Canada has not provided an ETA on the harmonization.

Find out the correct labels to use below:

 

Lithium Battery Labels as of August 1, 2017

IMDG
Changes for IMDG Code 38th Edition

Next year signals the start of a new biennium for transportation of dangerous goods. Ocean shippers should take a look at what’s in store in the new International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG) which has been updated to reflect the most recent revisions of the UN Recommendation for the Transport of Dangerous Goods.

Compared to other regulations, the IMDG Code has a rather complex method of implementing changes. The IMDG Code 38th Edition was published in November of this year, so it will be referred to as the 2016 edition. However, the changes will not go into effect for 2016. Instead, shippers and carriers may start to use the new edition as of January 1, 2017. But a transition period of one year is given, so the changes are not mandatory until January 1, 2018. A new edition of the Code will be published near the end of 2018, but there will be another transition period of a year during which the 38th edition can still be used.

IMDG Transition Timeline
IMDG Transition Timeline

Think of it this way – during odd-numbered years you can use the current edition of the code, or the previous one. During even-numbered years, you must use the latest code published.

So, what changes can we expect for ocean shipment? It turns out that this biennium will not be one of massive changes, but Continue Reading…

IMDG
Another Acronym for our Alphabet Soup (SOLAS)

IMO Amends SOLAS

Shippers who load containers in Canadian waters must comply with the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and section 104.(1) of the Cargo, Fumigation and Tackle Regulations (CFTR) which incorporates SOLAS (International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea) Chapter VI, regulation 2.

There is a new amendment adopted by the IMO (International Maritime Organization) to SOLAS that is intended to:

  • improve container safety;
  • enhance maritime safety; and
  • reduce the dangers to container ships, their crews and all involved in moving containers through the supply chain.

This amendment will become effective July 1, 2016. They require that the shipper of a packed container to provide a signed shipping document that verifies the gross mass (VGM).

The shipper can determine the gross weight in one of two ways:

  • When a container is packed and sealed, the shipper may weigh, or have arranged that a third party weigh it.
  • The shipper or, a third party arranged by the shipper; may weigh:
    • each item of cargo (including package, non-packaged, unitized cargoes),
    • dunnage (loose material under and between items to prevent damage to cargo)
    • securing material that will be loaded into a container.

Then add the tare mass of the container to the sum of the single masses of the container’s contents.

The container cannot be loaded until the VGM has been verified by the terminal representative.

Shippers must adapt procedures to ensure that this requirement is met to avoid costly delays. The Continue Reading…