Placarding
Is a Placard Required?

Placards on a truck

Answers from the Helpdesk

Placarding is one of the more complicated areas of the hazardous materials regulations. There are so many variables and exceptions, no wonder it becomes confusing.

Let’s practice using a real helpdesk question.

What placards are required for each shipment (49 CFR or TDG)? Write down your answer before scrolling down to read the answer.

SHIPMENT 1: 

9000 LBS (4082 KG) CORROSIVE UN1719, (ALL NON-BULK PACKAGING)

 SHIPMENT 2: 

(ALL NON-BULK PACKAGING)

9000 LBS (4082 KG) CORROSIVE UN1719
1500 LBS (680 KG) CORROSIVE UN1791

1500 LBS (680 KG) CORROSIVE UN3264
1500 LBS (680 KG) CORROSIVE UN3265

 SHIPMENT 3: 

(ALL NON-BULK PACKAGING)

200 LBS (91 KG) CORROSIVE UN1719
200 LBS (91 KG) CORROSIVE UN1791,

200 LBS (91 KG) CORROSIVE UN3264
200 (91 KG) LBS CORROSIVE, UN3265

Click here to see the 49 CFR answers »
Click here to see the TDGR answers »

49 CFR Regulations

The placarding requirements are found in Part 172.500 of the Hazardous Materials Regulations. The general rule is going to be:

If in bulk, you always need a placard.

If non-bulk, then it depends on if the hazard class is in Table 1 or 2, and the amount that is being shipped.

Also, in most cases, 4 placards are required, one on each side and one on each end.

When shipping in bulk, a UN number is required on the placard. You will find this referenced in the marking section Part 172.331.

(a) Each person who offers a hazardous material to a motor carrier for transportation in a bulk packaging shall provide the motor carrier with the required identification numbers on placards or plain white square-on-point display configurations, as authorized, or shall affix orange panels containing the required identification numbers to the packaging prior to or at the time the material is offered for transportation, unless the packaging is already marked with the identification number as required by this subchapter.

(b) Each person who offers a bulk packaging containing a hazardous material for transportation shall affix to the packaging the required identification numbers on orange panels, square-on-point configurations or placards, as appropriate, prior to, or at the time the packaging is offered for transportation unless it is already marked with identification numbers as required by this subchapter.

For non-bulk, the following references are also important:
The reference for this is 49 CFR §172.301(a)(1)(3):

“(3) Large quantities of a single hazardous material in non-bulk packages. A transport vehicle or freight container containing only a single hazardous material in non-bulk packages must be marked, on each side and each end as specified in the §172.332 or §172.336, with the identification number specified for the hazardous material in the §172.101 Table, subject to the following provisions and limitations:

(i) Each package is marked with the same proper shipping name and identification number;

(ii) The aggregate gross weight of the hazardous material is 4,000 kg (8,820 pounds) or more;

(iii) All of the hazardous material is loaded at one loading facility;

(iv) The transport vehicle or freight container contains no other material, hazardous or otherwise; and

(v) The identification number marking requirement of this paragraph (a)(3) does not apply to Class 1, Class 7, or to non-bulk packagings for which identification numbers are not required.”

Answers:

Which placards are required according to 49 CFR?

Shipment 1: 4- Class 8 placards are required with UN1719

Why? The class 8 placard is required as it is being shipped as a single commodity in non-bulk exceeding 8,820 lbs (4000.68 kg)

Shipment 2: 4- Class 8 placards are required, UN number not required

Why? The class 8 Placard is required, the UN number is not required because there are multiple hazardous goods being shipped on the same shipment

Shipment 3: No placards are required

Why? No placards are required because Class 8 materials appear on table 2 and is under 454 kg (1001 lbs)

Transport Canada

The placarding requirements are found in Part 4 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations (TDG).

The following are some general rules for placarding under the TDG regulations in Canada.

In most cases, four placards are required, on both sides and both ends of the transport unit.

A placard is required if the chemical is in a quantity or concentration for which an ERAP is required.

If 500 kg or more of a quantity is being transported of one hazard class a placard is required.

4.15.2 UN Numbers on a Large Means of Containment says:

UN numbers, except UN numbers for dangerous goods included in Class 1, Explosives, must be displayed on a large means of containment in accordance with subsection 4.8(2) if the dangerous goods

(a) are in a quantity or concentration for which an emergency response assistance plan is required; or

(b) are a liquid or a gas in direct contact with the large means of containment.

4.16.1 Placarding Exemption for Dangerous Goods Having a Gross Mass of 500 kg or Less says:

Subsection (1) provides an exemption from placarding requirements if the dangerous goods in or on a road vehicle or railway vehicle have a gross mass that is less than or equal to 500 kg.

Subsection (2) sets out which dangerous goods cannot be counted in the 500 kg and are, therefore, subject to the placarding requirements.

  1. Except in the case of the dangerous goods listed in subsection (2), a placard is not required to be displayed on a road vehicle or railway vehicle if the dangerous goods in or on the road vehicle or railway vehicle have a gross mass that is less than or equal to 500 kg.
  2. The exemption set out in subsection (1) does not apply to dangerous goods
    • (a) requiring an emergency response assistance plan;
    • (b) requiring the display of a subsidiary class placard in accordance with section 4.15.1;
    • (c) included in Class 1, Explosives, except for
      • (i) explosives referred to in subsection 4.17(1), and
      • (ii) explosives included in Class 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 or 1.5, if
    • (A) the explosives are not subject to special provision 85 or 86 and have a net explosives quantity that is less than or equal to 10 kg, or
    • (B) the explosives are subject to special provision 85 or 86 and the number of articles of explosives is less than or equal to 1000;
      • (d) included in Class 2.1, Flammable Gases, if the road vehicle or railway vehicle is to be transported by ship;
      • (e) included in Class 2.3, Toxic Gases;
      • (f) included in Class 4.3, Water-reactive Substances;
      • (g) included in Class 5.2, Organic Peroxides, Type B, liquid or solid, that require a control or emergency temperature;
      • (h) included in Class 6.1, Toxic Substances, that are subject to special provision 23; or
      • (i) included in Class 7, Radioactive Materials, that require a Category III – Yellow label.

Answers:

Which placards are required according to the TDGR?

Shipment 1: 4- Class 8 placards are required UN number not required

Why? Class 8 placards are required, because this shipment exceeds 500 KG, but the UN number is not required as there is no ERAP and it is not in a large means of containment

Shipment 2: 4- Class 8 placards are required, UN number not required

Why? Placards are required as the shipment is over 500 KG, but UN numbers on the placards are not required because the ERAP is either non-existent or is not met.

Shipment 3: No placards are required

Why? Because no ERAP are met, and the quantity is less than 500 kg.

No Placards are required for class 8 hazardous material for shipments under 500 KG and when no ERAP is met.


ICC Compliance Center has a variety of tools and “cheat sheets” to help you understand the placarding requirements. Visit our website for more information.

Fire Safety
Spring Ahead – Fire Safety

Smoke Detector

Springtime Fire Safety

It is that time of year again, where we all lose an hour in our day. The good news is that we also gain an hour of daylight, and it means that warmer weather is just around the corner.

Many organizations including the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) suggest taking the time to also check smoke alarms. The NFPA states:

Roughly two-thirds of home fire deaths occur in homes with no smoke alarms or working smoke alarms. When smoke alarms should have worked but failed to operate, it is usually because batteries were missing, disconnected, or dead. NFPA provides the following guidelines around smoke alarms:

  • Test smoke alarms at least once a month using the test button.
  • Make sure everyone in the home understands the sound of the smoke alarm and knows how to respond.
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.
  • Replace the smoke alarm immediately if it doesn’t respond properly when tested.
  • Smoke alarms with nonreplaceable (long-life) batteries are designed to remain effective for up to 10 years. If the alarm chirps, a warning that the battery is low, replace the entire smoke alarm right away.
  • For smoke alarms with any other type of battery, replace batteries at least once a year. If the alarm chirps, replace only the battery.

Fire Extinguishers

Also, take time to make sure your fire extinguishers are in good working order. If they are in a business, ensure that inspections are up-to-date. The NFPA provides the following guidance regarding the use of an extinguisher:

Safety tips

  • Use a portable fire extinguisher when the fire is confined to a small area, such as a wastebasket, and is not growing; everyone has exited the building; the fire department has been called or is being called; and the room is not filled with smoke.
  • To operate a fire extinguisher, remember the word PASS:
    • Pull the pin. Hold the extinguisher with the nozzle pointing away from you, and release the locking mechanism.
    • Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.
    • Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.
    • Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.
  • For the home, select a multi-purpose extinguisher (can be used on all types of home fires) that is large enough to put out a small fire, but not so heavy as to be difficult to handle.
  • Choose a fire extinguisher that carries the label of an independent testing laboratory.
  • Read the instructions that come with the fire extinguisher and become familiar with its parts and operation before a fire breaks out. Local fire departments or fire equipment distributors often offer hands-on fire extinguisher trainings.
  • Install fire extinguishers close to an exit and keep your back to a clear exit when you use the device so you can make an easy escape if the fire cannot be controlled. If the room fills with smoke, leave immediately.
  • Know when to go.

Sources:
http://www.nfpa.org/news-and-research/news-and-media/press-room/news-releases/2014/nfpa-encourages-testing-smoke-alarms-as-daylight-saving-time-begins

http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/by-topic/fire-and-life-safety-equipment/fire-extinguishers

PHMSA Update
A Small Victory for Harmonization … For Now (HM-215N)

PHMSA Withdraws Final Rule

—PHMSA Update HM-215N

The Pipelines and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) of the Department of Transportation (DOT) has withdrawn a Final Rule that was intended to be published in the Federal Register on January 26.

The Final Rule, HM-215N, would have updated the U.S. “Hazardous Materials Regulations” to reflect international standards. This was due to the new administration’s Regulatory Freeze executive memorandum, issued January 20, 2017.

Harmonization

HM-215N would have harmonized the 49 CFR regulations to the latest version of the UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, the ICAO Technical Instruction’s on the Safe Transport of Dangerous Goods, the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code.

New lithium battery label     New Lithium Battery Mark and Pictogram
New marks and labels introduced in the upcoming international regulations.

 

This delay has made it particularly confusing for shippers of lithium batteries, who have transitioned to the new handling mark, and hazard class 9 label, shown in these international regulations.

Usage

Last week, PHMSA issued a Notice that allows offerors and carriers to use the 2017-2018 versions of the international regulations without fear of enforcement. In addition, it is allowing users to mark and label packages in accordance with either the 2015-2016 or 2017-2018 IATA/ICAO and IMDG regulations.

This notice is limited to 49 CFR Parts 171.4(t) and (v). This notice is expected to be in place until HM-215N is release, or this notice is otherwise rescinded or otherwise modified.

For a full version of the notice, please click here.

ICC is your source for hazardous materials products, services, and training, all under one roof. Contact us today.

Safe Holiday Decorating

Holiday Safety

December means festivity and cheer for many. Many offices, including ours, enjoy bringing the festivities to work by decorating our offices, cubicles, and other office areas.

Safety is always important, festive occasions included. Safety+Health suggest the following to help prevent injuries while celebrating on the job. (Safety+Health Magazine)

Safe decorating

  • Don’t stand on a chair to hang decorations. Use a stepladder, and make sure to read and follow the instructions and warnings on the label. And never hang decorations from fire sprinklers – they can prevent the sprinklers from operating properly. OSHA regulations state that stacked materials should never be closer than 18 inches below fire sprinklers.
  • Planning to string decorative lights or other electrical items in your workspace? The Electrical Safety Foundation International, a nonprofit organization, states that workers should:
    • Be sure that all electrical items are certified by a nationally recognized independent testing lab.
    • Inspect all lights, decoration and extension cords for damage before using.
    • Avoid overloading electrical outlets with too many decorations or electrical devices – they can overheat and cause a fire.
    • Never try to make a three-prong plug fit into a two-prong outlet.
    • Turn off all indoor and outdoor electrical decorations before leaving.

ICC Compliance Center offers a variety of safety courses to train employees on the hazards in the workplace. Visit our website and view our safety courses for more information

From our ICC family to yours, have a safe and happy holiday season.

Safe Winter Driving

As the weather gets colder and inevitable snow and ice arrive, it is time to think about winter driving, and the challenges it brings.

According to the Federal Highway Administration, more than 24% of accidents are cold-weather related.

AAA (http://exchange.aaa.com/safety/roadway-safety/winter-driving-tips/#.WDMTHrIrLRY) recommends the following for driving in snow:

  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
  • The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
  • Know your brakes. If you have anti-lock brakes (ABS) and need to slow down quickly, press hard on the pedal-it’s normal for the pedal to vibrate a bit when the ABS is activated. In cars without ABS, use “threshold” breaking, keeping your heel on the floorboard and using the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
  • Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed down hill as slowly as possible.
  • Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
  • Stay home. If you really don’t have to go out, don’t. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can. Don’t tempt fate: If you don’t have somewhere you have to be, watch the snow from indoors.

ICC Compliance Center cares about our employees and customers. Stay safe this winter season.

Shipping a Gift? Ask Yourself, is it Dangerous Goods?

This weekend, my husband and I decided it was time to do some clean up and sell some things on e-Bay. We did the usual photo and description, and posted a few odd items. When we came to the last item, a PS3 controller, my husband stopped and said, “I am going to have to ship this as dangerous goods.”

It got me thinking, how many people would know that? I wonder how many lithium batteries are mailed or shipped by average people, never thinking that they are doing something wrong and potentially very dangerous. Even scarier, is the thought that my family could be on that same plane.

As the holiday season approaches, people everywhere will be sending gifts to loved ones around the world. What many people still do not realize, is that innocent gifts like game controllers, lap-top computers, cell phones, and tablets are dangerous goods.

The definition of “dangerous goods” varies slightly from regulation to regulation, but basics means  articles or materials capable of posing significant risk to people, health, property, or the environment  when transported. Examples include: perfumes, paints, aerosol cans, and anything with a lithium battery including power tools, computers, and cameras.

Dangerous goods need to be packaged and labeled in accordance with the regulations. You also need to be a trained person to ship them.

Before you wrap that gift, contact the post office or the shipping company and ask them if it is considered dangerous goods. If it is, the best solution might be to seek a local packaging and crating company to assist. ICC Compliance Center has a list of “Repackers” around the USA and Canada that can be found here: http://www.thecompliancecenter.com/partners/.

Since not everyone is privileged enough to be in the dangerous goods industry, as dangerous goods professionals, we need to do our part in to educate and protect others, so all families can have a safe holiday season. Help me educate others by sharing this on your social media pages.

OSHA & PHMSA Working Together

OSHA & PHMSA Issue Joint Guidance Memorandum

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) issued a joint guidance memorandum that is intended to provide clarity on the applicability and relationship between, DOT’s labeling requirements under the HMR and OSHA’s labeling requirements for bulk shipments under the HCS 2012.

PHMSA’s hazardous materials regulations require labeling of hazardous materials in transportation, while OSHA requires labeling on containers in the workplace.

When OSHA released its Hazcom 2012 (29 CFR Part 1910.1200) revisions, Appendix C.2.3.3 stated that “If a label has a DOT transport pictogram, the corresponding HCS pictogram shall not appear.” The Hazardous Materials Regulations state “No person may offer for transportation and no carrier may transport a package bearing any marking or label which by its color, design, or shape could be confused with or conflict with a label prescribed by this part” (49 CFR Part 172.401(b)).

This raised many questions with stakeholders, and shortly thereafter, OSHA published a brief that stated that PHMSA does not view the pictograms as a conflict, and both may appear. OSHA continues on in the brief to state they intend on revising C.2.3.3, but in the meantime, they will allow both to appear. This new guidance document further confirms this position.

The Joint Guidance Memorandum can be found at https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/joint_phmsa_memo_09192016.html


ICC is your source for compliant DOT/OSHA or TDG/WHMIS labeling requirements. Contact us to find out how we can help.

OSHA
The Top 10 – OSHA Violations 2016

Top 10s

When you think “Top 10” you might think about David Letterman’s top 10 lists. These lists are perhaps his greatest legacy from his run on the “The Late Show” (see 5 Top 10 Lists from David Letterman)

Unfortunately, this blog is not about those top 10 lists, but rather something far more serious, OSHA’s Top 10 violations.

This list is comprised of nearly 32,000 inspections of workplaces by federal OSHA staff. The top 3 violations remain the same as the last three years. They include: fall protection, hazard communication and scaffolds.

The complete Top 10 OSHA violations list includes:

  1. Fall protection
  2. Hazard communication
  3. Scaffolds
  4. Respiratory protection
  5. Lockout/tagout
  6. Powered industrial trucks
  7. Ladders
  8. Machine guarding
  9. Electrical wiring
  10. Electrical, general requirements

According to the Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), there are more than 4500 worker deaths and approximately 3 million workers injured every year. Many of the deaths are associated with fall, poor scaffolding and forklift operations. (https://blog.dol.gov/2016/10/18/top-10-osha-citations-of-2016-a-starting-point-for-workplace-safety/)

Prevention

What is astonishing is that so many of the deaths and injuries are preventable. Employers and employees must take safety seriously. Unlike David Letterman’s Top 10, there is nothing funny about workers dying or being injured.

OSHA has recently released new recommendations for safety and health programs that will help prevent injuries and deaths, reduce costs, improve compliance, and engage workers. This recommendation can be found here: https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/.

Training

Training is vital. Ensure workers are trained, and have understood the training. Repeat the training as often as needed to reinforce the concepts and remind the worker that safety on the job is essential.

Contact ICC for more information on training courses available. We can assist employers with their employee training requirements. Most courses are available online, and many segments take less than 30 minutes. Everyone can spare 30 minutes to ensure that each and every day, they leave work the same way they arrived.

At ICC our motto is “See something, say something”. Remember that safety is everyone’s concern.

Lithium
Samsung Galaxy Note 7 BANNED

Don’t Bring Your Note 7 with You on a Plane

More bad news for Samsung Galaxy Note 7 owners. Not only do you have to worry about them catching on fire, but now, you can’t even bring them with you when you travel by air.

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT), with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), announced it is issuing an emergency order to ban all Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphone devices from air transportation in the United States.

This emergency order bans all Samsung Galaxy Note 7 devices from “being on their person, in carry-on baggage or in checked baggage on flights to, from or within the USA.

The emergency order can be found here:
https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2016-25322.pdf

In September, Samsung announced the recall of over 1.9 million Galaxy Note7 devices. The Consumer Product Safety  Commission says that Samsung received 96 reports of lithium batteries overheating, including 13 burns and 47 reports of property damage. The CPSC recall notice can be found here: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Samsung-Expands-Recall-of-Galaxy-Note7-Smartphones-Based-on-Additional-Incidents-with-Replacement-Phones


If you need to ship lithium ion or metal batteries by themselves, packed in equipment or  contained in equipment contact ICC for training and supplies to ensure that they are transported safely.

Environmental Update
EPA Aligns 40 CFR Part 370 with OSHA Hazcom 2012

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a final technical amendment to 40 CFR Part 370, in June 2016 which aligns the hazardous chemical reporting regulations to the changes in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Hazcom 2012.

These changes have a compliance date of January 1, 2018, and affect reporting under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), sections 311 and 312.

Section 311 of EPCRA requires facilities to submit a SDS or a list of hazardous chemicals grouped by categories of physical and health hazards. Section 312 of EPCRA requires facilities to submit an emergency and hazardous chemical inventory form yearly by March 1.

Prior to the change in 2012, the hazard communication regulations (OSHA) were performance oriented, and did not specify the language/description or format that the company had to use. Once the hazard communication regulations were updated, stakeholders requested that EPA align the wording to be consistent with the new OSHA Hazcom 2012 regulations.

Some of the changes in 40 CFR Part 370 include:

  • Technical terms have been updated (i.e., Material Safety Data Sheet to Safety Data Sheet)
  • The definition of Hazard Category has been updated
  • The “Five categories” (Fire/Sudden release of pressure/Reactive/Immediate acute and Delayed-chronic) have been changed to match the physical and health hazards outlined the Hazcom 2012
  • The Tier I and Tier II inventory forms are modified
  • Tier 2 Submit, the software will be updated, and EPA is providing flexibility for states to modify their software by January 2018

Look for these changes to be found in Section 15 of your Safety Data Sheets in the near future.

Contact ICC Compliance Center for more information, or if you need help updating your SDSs.