Securepacc 4GV packaging
New and Improved Securepacc™ – 4GV Packaging

A while back I wrote a blog about the benefits of variation packaging. http://blog.thecompliancecenter.com/benefits-rules-variation-packaging/. For those interested in 4GV packaging, often times you are left with few options. You are either left with using dusty vermiculite as your absorbent, or hard to put together corrugated inserts with absorbent bags that take a long time to assemble. We know how valuable your time is, so here at ICC Compliance Center, we developed a new line of 4GV packaging that is the easiest dust-free (non-vermiculite) 4GV packaging to assemble on the market.

Vermiculite Packaging

Vermiculite for use in a 4GV packaging.

For the most part, vermiculite seems to be the industry standard in terms of the cushioning/absorbent used in 4GV packaging. There are several benefits to using vermiculite as it is a fast-acting absorbent that does a fantastic job out in the field if liquid were to leak from the inner containers, and provides fairly good protection as well. In addition, it is relatively easy to use – just adhere to the cushioning distances detailed in the closing instructions and pour into the box. However, because vermiculite can be dusty and messy, you may be at an increased risk of contamination of your product, especially in lab settings. Plus, breathing in dust from vermiculite over a long period of time has been known to cause respiratory issues. Symptoms associated with inhalation Continue Reading…

PHMSA Has New Portal for Reporting Incidents
Palais des Nations in Geneva

A long time ago, when I was first living on my own, I made, or tried to make, a cheesecake. All the ingredients had been mixed and poured carefully into the pan. All I had to do was put it in the oven and leave it for the appropriate baking time. Unfortunately, as I was transferring it from the counter, the oven door shifted and jarred my hand. My delicious cheesecake batter ended up sloshing into the preheated oven, solidifying and creating a long and tedious cleanup instead of a tasty treat. All I could tell myself as I scrubbed away was, “It’s a learning experience.”

The same is true of hazardous materials (HAZMAT) incidents. While they produce short-term pain, the long-term gain is that we learn more about how to handle them safely. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has required for many years that incidents such as fires, spills or the discovery by the carrier of unidentified hazardous materials should be reported to them. Under the DOT, the Pipelines and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), which is responsible for the Hazardous Materials Regulations, established a specific form for this, called DOT 5800.1, the Hazardous Materials Incident Report.

What Needs to Be Reported?

The requirements for reporting are given in 49 CFR section 171.15, “Immediate notice of certain hazardous materials incidents.” A reportable incident is defined as Continue Reading…

ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: October 1

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows of – the regulations.

Placarding Bulk Truckloads

Q. My truck has 4000kgs of drums of Class 3 UN1993 in it. Truck has Class 3 UN1993 placard on it . We pick up 1 empty tote (IBC) which is Class 3 UN1993 also. Can we keep the same placard on the truck or do we need to add Class 3 only? Same with empty drums. We just need to add primary CLASS card? All transported via ground within Canada.
A.Well the drums don’t need UN numbered placards since drums are considered small means of containment. A plain class 3 placard will do to represent the drums. It used to be in the Regulations that over 4000kg from one shipper could display UN numbered placard but it was repealed recently. Totes, even empty with residue, requires UN numbered placards for liquids in direct contact with the means of containment. You don’t need to add plain class 3 placard for the drums as both the drum and tote content is hazard class 3. So technically the truck displayed the correct placard (UN1993). If the drums were empty and less than 500kg gross mass then no placard will be required; however, if you Continue Reading…
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OSHA’s Website on Workplace Chemicals
Laptop on wood table

New Tools for Chemical Data

Chemical data and information are an integral part of my work. Data is needed for a shipper of hazardous materials or dangerous goods.  It is needed for an author of Safety Data Sheets (SDS). It may also be needed for OSHA workplace labeling. Sometimes you need several websites or resources open all at once to gather the needed data.

As such, OSHA has created a tool that you may find helpful. It is called the “OSHA Occupational Chemical Database”. The link for it is https://www.osha.gov/chemicaldata/.  It is a compilation of data from several agencies and organizations put into one online resource. The first paragraph on the site calls this “OSHA’s premier one-stop shop for occupational chemical information”. For chemicals found on the website, there is information on some or all of the following topics:

  • Physical/Chemical properties
  • Synonyms
  • Exposure limits – OSHA, NIOSH, ACGIH
  • NFPA ratings
  • Sampling information
  • Additional Resources and Literature References

The site is searchable mainly by chemical name, CAS number or alphabetically. There is even a feature that will allow you to search for chemicals under certain topics. The site allows you to group chemicals by Permissible Exposure Limits (PEL), Carcinogenic classification and Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health hazards (IDLH). That aside, once you have found your chemical, this site provides a variety of information. Simply click on the link listed Continue Reading…

ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: Sept 24

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows of – the regulations.

Limited Quantity from Canada to the USA

Q: I ship my material as a limited quantity under TDG in Canada. What do I need to do to ship it to customers in the US? We are also considering opening a hub in the US.
A: You will have to receive training in 49 CFR. Even though there are many similarities between the 2 regulations they are not exact matches. You may be able to use some reciprocity agreements in regards to transborder shipments. A hub based in the US will definitely have to have 49 CFR training.

New testing, now what?

Q: We just ran some testing on one of our products. It has been shipped as UN2468 in the past. However, the test report O.1 came back and said our material is not an oxidizer. What does that mean for the next time we ship the product?
A: If you have proof that your product is no longer a hazardous material, then you do not have to ship it as such. It does not meet the classification criteria set out in 49 CFR starting in §173.50.

TDG wallet card requirements

Q: I have worked with a courier company for Continue Reading…
Fire Safety
NFPA’s Fire Prevention Week 2018
2018 Fire Prevention Week -  Look Listen Learn

October 7 – 13 Is Fire Prevention Week

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has designated the week of October 7th-13th as Fire Prevention Week. This date was chosen as the Great Chicago fire started on October 8, 1871. Each year a theme for the week is chosen in an effort to keep fire safety present in people’s minds. This year’s theme is “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware – fire can happen anywhere.

Those 3 words are simplistic but necessary when it comes to fire prevention, preparedness and risk. It carries over from the home, to the workplace and more. Look is for people to look around their home, office and workplace. Listen is mainly focused on the sound of smoke or fire alarms. Learn is about knowing multiple ways out of a room. Here are some further thoughts on each word for you to consider.

Look for places fire could start:

  • Cooking areas
  • Heating equipment
  • Electrical and lighting equipment
  • Candles

Listen for the sound of the smoke alarm:

  • Take them seriously
  • Know where are they located in the home, office and workplace
  • Test them monthly
  • Replace any over 10 years old

Learn two ways out of every room:

  • Have an escape plan in the home, office and workplace
  • Set a meeting place
  • Know the path from each exit to the outside
  • Keep the areas near the exit points easily accessible

The NFPA Continue Reading…

United Nations Logo
2018 United Nations Regulatory Updates
Palais des Nations in Geneva

What’s New at the UN for Transport?

At this time of year all the regulatory updates start. Every time a notation comes across my desk or email I can’t help but think about a famous line in the movie “Sixteen Candles”. That particular line is “What’s happening hot stuff?” Click here to see the actual movie clip. One of these days, I want a presentation to start with this. It would sure break the ice on some rather detailed subject matter.

Having prepared you for thinking about what’s happening or changing, we have to start at the UN level specifically. Much of this information comes from a presentation by Duane Pfund at the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. We need to focus on is what changed from the 2015 – 2016 biennium. That biennium gave us Revision 20 of the UN Model Recommendations for the Transport of Dangerous Goods. Revision 20 is what will drive the changes starting in January 2019.

What’s Happening or Changing for 2019?

  • Class 8 Corrosive Materials:
    • A new alternative method for classifying these mixtures is being introduced. It revolves around using the GHS Purple Book bridging principles and calculation methods. Note that flammable gases and explosives are on the list for this same concept in the current biennium.
  • Dangerous Goods in Articles:
Single Packaging
Change Notice: BX-11DF

Dear Valued Customer,

In an effort to continuously improve the quality and performance of our UN packaging, we occasionally must make changes to the specifications and usage instructions. This notice is to inform you that the following changes have been made to BX-11DF (PK-MTM11 and PK-MTM11NS).

  1. The clear tape required for closure of this packaging has changed from 3M #305 48mm wide clear tape to 3M #375 48mm wide clear tape. This change to a stronger tape caused the box to perform better in drop tests, resulting in a more secure packaging. 

Click here to view our packing instructions and certificate downloads »

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our customer relations center at 888-442-9628 in the USA, 888-977-4834 in Canada.

Thank you,
Michael S. Zendano
Packaging Specialist

ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk Sept 17

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows of – the regulations.

Is Paperwork Required for my Shipment? (TDG)

Q: Do I need to send paperwork to ship a class 2.2 empty oxygen cylinder through ground in Canada?
A: The TDGR 2.14(b) classifies a compressed gas as Division 2.2 if it has no other hazard class properties and has an absolute pressure less than 280 kPa at 20O C. Thus, if the cylinder only contained a Class 2.2 gas without other subsidiary hazards and the pressure is now below 179 kPa gauge, then it’s not DG and the regulations don’t apply. This means that the Class 2.2 labels must be removed.

How do I ship a product that is regulated by DOT, but is not regulated by IMDG?

Q: Can you please help me with the following?
  • HazMat is Class 3 Combustible Liquid w/i U.S. (fp of 168 F).
  • It is shipped in IBC (bulk packaging) and non-bulk.
  • If to be shipped by vessel in an IBC it would be a Class 3 Combustible Liquid per US DOT but not a Class 3 per IMDG.
How would one ship this HazMat in a bulk packaging by vessel when it must first be transported by highway to reach the port? If shipped as Continue Reading…
Airplane Icon
IATA Electronic Dangerous Goods Declaration INFr8 (eDGD)
Unloading an airplane

Another Step in the Digital Direction

For the most part, the dangerous goods world is one of the few industries that still relies heavily on using paper documentations, specifically when it comes to shipping declarations. In one of my previous blogs, we talked about DG AutoCheck which is simply a system IATA unveiled that digitally checks the compliance of a shipper’s declarations by simply uploading or scanning the paperwork into the system. As a part of IATA’s e-freight initiative, the digital process is being taken one step further with the implementation the INFr8 (eDGD) digital system.

What is INFr8 (eDGD)?

Unlike DG Auto Check which is intended for use by airlines, ground handlers, and freight forwarders, this digital platform is intended to include shippers as well to digitally create and send electronic Dangerous Goods Declarations (eDGD) through the entire air cargo supply chain. The dangerous goods process has traditionally been paper-based due to the lack of digital standards. The eDGD validation module ensures that the information on the shipper’s declaration is correct against IATA regulations and the specific airline’s requirements as well. Currently, airlines can only begin checking the documentation after handover. Thanks to the new electronic system, errors in accompanying documentation can be detected and ironed out before the airline even receives the shipment. This means documentation errors can be detected and eliminated at an early stage, reducing Continue Reading…