Lithium Battery
Passengers Traveling with Lithium Batteries

Inside passenger airplane

Thinking About Lithium Batteries as a Passenger

Recently in my travels, I found myself stuck in a long security line at our local airport. Being that it was during Spring Break, there was a wide variety of travelers from college students to retirees looking to re-connect with family. Although there were people of all ages and travel experience they all seemed to have one thing in common, they were confused how to travel with their laptop computers and other types of portable electronics containing lithium batteries. Let’s discuss some general guidance on how to travel with specific portable electronics that contain lithium batteries referencing some recently issued documents by IATA.

Portable Electronic Devices (PED) Containing Batteries

close up of man holding cellphone in front of laptop

Portable Electronic Devices including electronics such as cameras, mobile phones, laptops, and tablets containing batteries carried by passengers for personal use should be carried in carry-on baggage.

For devices that can be packed in checked baggage:

  • The device must be protected from damage and to prevent unintentional activation;
  • The device must be completely turned off (not in sleep or hibernation mode). 

Spare lithium batteries

Lithium Battery

Each spare battery must be individually protected to prevent short circuits by placing them in the original retail packaging or by otherwise insulating terminals by taping over exposed terminals or simply placing each battery in a separate plastic bag or protective pouch and carried in carry-on baggage only. Items that contain Continue Reading…

Single Packaging
Change Notice: BX-32 & BX-79

Dear Valued Customer,

In an effort to continuously improve the quality and performance of our UN packaging, we occasionally must make changes to the specifications and usage instructions. This notice is to inform you that the following changes have been made to BX-32 (Including PK-N4QT, PK-N4QTC, and PK-N4PTC.)

  1. The clear tape required for closure of this packaging has changed from 3M #305 48mm wide clear tape to 3M #375 48mm wide clear tape. This change to a stronger tape caused the box to perform better in drop tests, resulting in a more secure packaging.
  2. The amount of clips that attach to each can is changing from 4 to 6.

This notice is to also inform you that the following changes have been made to BX-79 (Including PK-TALLC and PK-NTALL)

  1. The maximum gross weight allowance for this design has been increased from 7.7 kg to 8.6 kg. The specification marking that is printed on the boxes has been updated to reflect this change.
  2. The clear tape required for closure of this packaging has changed from 3M #305 48mm wide clear tape to 3M #375 48mm wide clear tape. This change to a stronger tape caused the box to perform better in drop tests, resulting in a more secure packaging.

Click here to view our packing instructions and certificate downloads »

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact our customer relations center at 888-442-9628 Continue Reading…

Repacking Dangerous Goods
Can I Ship Dangerous Goods to Brazil with my TDG Training Certificate?

Calcium Oxide UN1910 UN Packaging

The answer is: No.

Shipping Dangerous Goods from Canada to Brazil

Now the Background Story

I was forwarded an email from a very nice lady (let’s call her Jane), who is registered to take our public TDG training coming up in a couple of weeks at our Delta, B.C. office.

She said she has some product that needs to be shipped to Brazil, which she was told was dangerous goods. Jane wanted to know if we sell corrosive labels and if we can do up the dangerous goods document or if she would be able to do it herself after she takes her training. I asked Jane to call me; sometimes it is just easier to talk on the phone.

Training or Repacking?

While on a call I asked her if she is taking our public air (IATA) training and she said, “No. Just the TDG“. I explained to Jane that by completing the TDG training she she will be certified to ship, handle, transport, and import dangerous goods within Canada via road, rail, and domestic marine; therefore, even after she takes her TDG training she can’t ship dangerous goods to Brazil.

After clarifying this with her I advised that if she wants to ship this product to Brazil she will need to either take an air training course or use our repackaging service.

I provided her with a repackaging quote and explained, “this Continue Reading…

Friday the 13th square icon
Superstitions in Reference to Safety (Friday the 13th)

Friday the 13th movie poster

Every country has superstitions. Those beliefs or notions that while irrational and not scientific seem to persist in society. They can impact how people respond to situations at home and even at work. In honor of Friday, April 13th, let’s take a look at a few and how they might impact safety.

Superstition #1:  Fear of Friday the 13th

The Superstition
People cite multiple reasons for being afraid of this date every year. Some trace it back to the Christian religion and the belief Jesus died on a Friday and there were 13 guests at the Last Supper. Others say this day coincides with the arrest of so many Knights Templar. Those skilled fighters tasked with escorting people to and from the Holy Land. Some still have nightmares from Jason in his hockey mask from the movies around this date.

The Safety
Regardless of the history, there is nothing in any of the safety or transport regulations that says this date should be avoided. If you need a day off, follow your company policy and do it by the book. For those trivia buffs out there, the fear of the number 13 and/or this date is known as paraskevidekatriaphobia and friggatriskaidekaphobia. One is of Greek derivation the other is Norse.

Superstition #2: Do Not Walk Under Ladders

The Superstition
This one stems from either the Christian religion and the idea of the Holy Trinity or ancient Egyptian and the shape of Continue Reading…

ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: April 2

How to determine if a product is regulated, SAPT on a SDS, Shipping a done, and using a UN package

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Is my product regulated?

Q. I have 2 products I distribute to various stores to sell. The SDS files say my product is not regulated under DOT and TDG in Section 14. Since this is sold as a consumer product, doesn’t that mean it is regulated for IATA should I ship it via air? (the SDS were emailed to me)
A. Nothing in your SDS files leads me to believe either one would meet any of the 9 hazard classes in IATA. This is further confirmed by neither SDS classifying the products for DOT and TDG. Basically, what you have are containers of non-regulated liquids.  There is no need for UN Specification packaging or paperwork for IATA or any other transport regulation.

SAPT on my SDS

A. Since the addition of UN numbers for polymerizing substances, we’ve been told we must include the Self-Accelerated Polymerization Temperature (SAPT) on our SDS documents in Section 9. Is this a new requirement?
Q. There is no requirement in OSHA HazCom 2012 to include that particular data point in Section 9. All of the Continue Reading…
dangerous goods forms, IATA, IMDG, 49 CFR, TDG documentation
How to Document Weights on DG/HazMat Transport Paperwork

Dangerous goods and hazmat forms

IATA, IMO, 49 CFR, & TDG Documentation

No one wants to talk about their weight. Ever. In the world of transport though, you have no choice. You are required to list on your transport paperwork some sort of weight, mass, or volume. The trick is to know which regulation requires what. Should be the net weight or gross weight? Is it per package or per packaging? Sadly, depending on the regulation, the answers to those questions may differ.

Before getting started, be sure you understand what all of those terms mean. I tend to default to the IATA regulations when it comes to definitions. These are found in Appendix A. Take note that these terms are also defined in the other regulations, too. In 49 CFR check in §171.9. For IMDG they are in 2 places – Volume 1, Chapter 1.2 and Volume 2, Appendix B. TDG defines them Part 1.4.

Definitions:

Package
The complete product of the packing operation consisting of the packaging and the contents prepared for transport.
Packaging
A receptacle and any other components or materials necessary for the receptacle to perform its containment function in conformance with the minimum packing requirements.
Means of containment
(in TDG) a container or packaging or any part of a means of transport that is or may be used to contain goods.
Means of transport
(in TDG) a road or railway vehicle, aircraft, vessel, pipeline or any other contrivance that is or may be used Continue Reading…
WHMIS 2015 Concentration Ranges – Finally Some SDS ‘Relief’

WHMIS Update

Health Canada Amendment to the HPR (Hazardous Product Regulations)

Health Canada published a proposed amendment to the HPR (Hazardous Product Regulations), which included an option to use specified concentration ranges for ingredients rather than the exact or actual chemical concentration on their SDSs (safety data sheets) (October 21, 2017).

That proposed amendment to allow ranges, would offer industry some Confidential Business Information (CBI) protection of formulations without having to go through a potentially costly CBI application claim under the Hazardous Materials Information Review Act (HMIRA).

Ahhh….’Relief’

After receiving comments and questions on the proposed amendment to allow the use of concentration ranges on SDSs, Health Canada has advised that the amendment has been approved and registered as of April 4, 2018. The approved amendment has yet to appear in the official Gazette II publication, but is expected to appear on April 18, 2018. Since it is officially registered, the amendment is effective, and can be applied, now.

The Details…

Health Canada, through this new amendment, is giving the option to suppliers, to list prescribed concentration ranges for ingredients on SDSs, without having to apply for a potentially costly exemption, in accordance with the HMIRA.

Suppliers may use this option when they wish to protect exact concentrations, or ‘actual concentration ranges’, which they feel are trade secrets.

The following are the approved, prescribed, list of concentration ranges:

0.1 – 1.0%
0.5 – 1.5%
1.0 – 5.0%
3.0 – 7.0%
5.0 Continue Reading…
Square on point with x marked out
Symbols in Transportation Regulations

Symbols in the IATA, IMDG, and 49 CFR

Solving the Mystery of the Regulation Symbols

As an avid reader and science nerd, the author Dan Brown is a different type of read. His lead character, Dr. Robert Langdon, is a professor of symbology. This means he studies and understands various symbols found in history and codes. Sometimes in transportation, we must be our own Dr. Langdon to decipher what the regulations are trying to tell us.

Here are some of the common symbols you could see with their meanings. Also included is where in each regulation you can find further information. By the way, have you purchased the March 2018 version of 49 CFR?

Symbols in IATA and IMDG:

  1. ■ The square: This symbol tells us new material has been added to the regulation or edition.
  2. ▲ The triangle: Here it indicates some part of that section of the regulation changed in some way.  It could be as simple as one word, sentence, or entire section that was reworked or clarified.
  3. ∅ The crossed-out circle: This one is a space holder showing some part or section has been removed, deleted or cancelled from the current edition. A very useful symbol, because it will keep you from looking for something that you knew was there but now can’t find.
  4. ☛ The pointing finger: Here is a symbol found only in IATA. It signifies this section or statement is more Continue Reading…
Graduation Cap
Who is Your Trainer?

Do you know who is training you?

Help! My team and I recently attended a training session and received our certification, but we continue to struggle with shipping our products.

That is a statement we hear far too often from clients who call our helpdesk for assistance. The shame of it is that  they seemingly wasted both time and money in a training program, but did not get out what they needed. Now, they have no choice but to take another course.

Specialists & Experts

Many people these days are calling themselves regulatory specialists, dangerous goods experts, or health and safety experts. The dangerous goods/hazardous materials field is a detailed, comprehensive topic requiring hands-on experience and a strong technical understanding of topics directly related to the industries we serve. Finding the right training company is critical to ensuring that the processes and procedures you need to continue operating remain uninterrupted.

Similar to Capital One Financial’s slogan “What’s in your Wallet” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3funZeuc9Q), you need to ask yourself “Who is your Trainer”.

Here are some questions you should consider when looking for trainers with the ‘right stuff’

  1. Do they have appropriate degrees and decades of education and knowledge?
  2. Do they have their finger on the pulse of pending regulatory changes?
  3. Can they customize training to suit your needs or are they offering the same course to everyone?
  4. Are they educated/trained in teaching adults?
  5. How detailed are their courses?
  6. Do they Continue Reading…
ICC's Regulatory Helpdesk
Regulatory Helpdesk: March 26

Proper shipping name, 500 kg exemption, MANCOMM symbol, and a TDG error

Welcome back to the Regulatory Helpdesk where we answer your dangerous goods & hazmat questions. We’re here to help you become independent with – and understand the whys and hows – of the regulations.

Proper Shipping Name (49 CFR)

Q. The customer wanted to know if they can print the product name in section 1 of the SDS next to the UN number on a hazard class label instead of the proper shipping name.

A. No. The proper shipping name on the outside of the box is a requirement per 49 CFR §172.301 (a) (1) and must be marked along with the UN number in a non-bulk packaging.

500 kg Exemption (TDG)

Q. Can I apply the 500 kg exemption when I have a mixed load where part of the load is excluded from using a DANGER placard under the 1000 kg Class restriction in TDGR §4.16 but the remainder is less than 500 kg gross? An example would be a consignment offered that included 1200 kg of Class 3, 100 kg of Class 8 and 300 kg of Class 9 (no ERAP required for either)?

A. In the DANGER placard scenario in 4.16, the Class 3 is restricted from using the DANGER placard specifically, based solely on quantity. Regular placarding requirements apply to the load based on the guidance text Continue Reading…